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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Latest University of Wisconsin Stories

2010-06-16 23:16:14

Establishing a firm link between environmental change and human disease has always been an iffy proposition. Now, however, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, writing in the current (June 16, 2010) online issue of the CDC journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, presents the most enumerated case to date linking increased incidence of malaria to land-use practices in the Amazon. The report, which combines detailed information on the incidence of malaria in 54 Brazilian...

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2010-06-01 06:55:00

Genetic abnormalities are most often discussed in terms of differences so miniscule they are actually called "snips" "” changes in a single unit along the 3 billion that make up the entire string of human DNA. "There's a whole world beyond SNPs "” single nucleotide polymorphisms "” and we've stepped into that world," says Brian Teague, a doctoral student in genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are much bigger changes in there." Variation on the order of...

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2010-05-27 06:21:21

NSF-supported researchers investigate a connection between the disappearance of certain plant communities and the late-Pleistocene extinction of large mammal species in North America Jack Williams is a plant ecologist at heart. He likes to figure out how--and why--plant communities change over time. "For my entire career, I've been keenly interested in the problem of 'no-analogue' plant communities, which are communities that existed in the past but are no longer found today," said Williams,...

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2010-05-24 12:40:00

On Monday, Australian scientists unveiled the world's smallest electronic switch measuring just a few atoms, which will shrink microchips and revolutionize computing speeds. The seven-atom transistor is the first step in a "quantum computer" which will make calculations millions of times faster than existing devices. Michelle Simmons, the lead researcher, said the technology has major implications for code breaking, financial transactions and weather forecasting, which involve testing...

2010-05-24 07:12:18

The "mineral-breathing" bacteria found in many oxygen-free environments may be "carbon-breathing" as well. Oxygen-free, or anaerobic, environments contain microbes sometimes described as "mineral-breathing" because they use iron oxides and other minerals in the same way we use oxygen. According to a study published online May 23 in the journal Nature Geoscience, this bacterial respiration may be accelerated by solid organic compounds in the soil. Led by University of Wisconsin-Madison...

2010-05-18 10:03:00

SAN DIEGO, May 18 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Council on Exercise (ACE), America's leading authority on fitness and the largest non-profit fitness certification, education and training organization in the world, today unveiled the findings of an exclusive study on the Slendertone Bottom Toner, an electronic muscle stimulation (EMS) device designed to tone the buttocks. The study, which was conducted in conjunction with the exercise and health program at the University of Wisconsin, La...

2010-05-13 16:42:00

PITTSBURGH, May 13 /PRNewswire/ -- In a paper published this week in the journal Science, experts caution that important ethical issues in the testing of new therapies like stem cells may not be receiving the attention they deserve. Carnegie Mellon University's Alex John London joined McGill University's Jonathan Kimmelman and Marina Emborg of University of Wisconsin-Madison and Wisconsin National Primate Research Center to examine the way scientists, physicians, and regulators evaluate...

2010-05-12 08:58:06

"Reach out and touch someone" "” good advertising slogan, or evolutionary imperative? How about both? What Madison Avenue knew decades ago has been observed in brain chemistry. A simple phone call from mom can calm frayed nerves by sparking the release of a powerful stress-quelling hormone, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Biological anthropologist Leslie Seltzer tested a group of seven- to 12-year-old girls with an impromptu speech and series of math...

2010-05-07 01:00:00

MADISON, Wis., May 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CDI), the world's largest producer of cellular tools for drug discovery and safety derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and iPS Academia Japan, Inc., today announced a nonexclusive licensing agreement for the seminal iPSC patent portfolio arising out of the work of Dr. Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D., Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University. CDI is the first company...

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2010-04-23 12:40:00

Scientists take first step toward controlling the growth of nanomaterials without catalysts Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently made a significant first step toward understanding how to control the growth of the nanotubes, nanowires and nanorods needed for renewable energy and other technology applications. These nanocrystalline materials, or nanomaterials, possess unique chemical and physical properties that can be used in solar energy panels, high energy density...