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Latest University of Wisconsin Stories

2012-03-14 12:55:12

For the first time, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made early retina structures containing proliferating neuroretinal progenitor cells using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from human blood. And in another advance, the retina structures showed the capacity to form layers of cells — as the retina does in normal human development — and these cells possessed the machinery that could allow them to communicate information. (Light-sensitive...

Image 1 - Following A Watershed's Winding Path To Sustainability
2012-03-11 07:17:32

National Science Foundation "Water, Sustainability and Climate" award fosters new view of urban rivers, lakes Cherokee Marsh, it's called, this sunken enclave surrounded by cattails and bulrushes.  The marsh is a mere dot on a map of the state of Wisconsin, but its importance reaches far beyond the wetland's edge. The Yahara River flows through Cherokee Marsh, swirling through coontail, sago pondweed, glade mallow and other plant species along the Yahara watershed as it goes. ...

2012-03-09 02:33:36

Minority principals and other administrative personnel at elementary and high schools play a key role in implementing policies and practices aimed at engaging immigrant parents of students, according to new research from Rice University, the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee and Vanderbilt University. The researchers examined how schools in districts with immigrant populations are addressing low levels of parent involvement in their children´s education and providing...

Researchers Working On Robots That Can Teach Humans
2012-03-05 12:57:00

[ Watch the Video ] When it comes to communication, sometimes it's our body language that says the most--especially when it comes to our eyes. "It turns out that gaze tells us all sorts of things about attention, about mental states, about roles in conversations," says Bilge Mutlu, a computer scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mutlu knows a thing or two about the psychology of body language. He bills himself as a human-computer interaction specialist. Support from the...

2012-02-07 13:40:49

The future of disease diagnosis may lie in a "breathalyzer"-like technology currently under development at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. New research published online in February in the peer-reviewed journal Metabolism demonstrates a simple but sensitive method that can distinguish normal and disease-state glucose metabolism by a quick assay of blood or exhaled air. Many diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and infections, alter the body's metabolism in distinctive ways. The new...

2012-02-06 22:34:18

When William Murphy works with some of the most powerful tools in biology, he thinks about making tools that can fit together. These constructions sound a bit like socket wrenches, which can be assembled to turn a half-inch nut in tight quarters, or to loosen a rusted-tight one-inch bolt using a very persuasive lever. The tools used by Murphy, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedics and rehabilitation at University of Wisconsin-Madison, however, are proteins, which...

2012-01-20 11:06:41

Fruit flies don't have noses, but a huge part of their brains is dedicated to processing smells. Flies probably rely on the sense of smell more than any other sense for essential activities such as finding mates and avoiding danger.  UW-Madison researchers have discovered that a gene called distal-less is critical to the fly's ability to receive, process and respond to smells. As reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists...

Government Silences Researchers' Work On Bird Flu Strains
2011-12-21 13:13:52

The U.S. government paid scientists to find out how the bird flu virus might mutate to become a bigger threat to people, but federal officials decided this information should be kept from the public. Federal officials asked the scientists on Tuesday to keep their findings away from being publicized in fear of the wrong people finding out the formula. The two labs in the study found that it appears easier than scientists believed for the H5N1 bird flu to evolve in a way that allows it to...

Researchers Debunks Myths Surrounding Math Gender Gap
2011-12-13 04:52:12

A major study of recent international data on school mathematics performance casts doubt on some common assumptions about gender and math achievement – in particular, the idea that girls and women have less ability due to a difference in biology. "We tested some recently proposed hypotheses that try to explain a supposed gender gap in math performance and found they were not supported by the data," says Janet Mertz, senior author of the study and a professor of oncology at the...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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