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Latest University School Stories

A Mother's Love Is Good For Child's Brain
2012-01-31 04:52:38

School-age children whose mothers nurtured them early in life have brains with a larger hippocampus, a key structure important to learning, memory and response to stress. The new research, by child psychiatrists and neuroscientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is the first to show that changes in this critical region of children's brain anatomy are linked to a mother's nurturing. Their research is published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy...

2012-01-30 14:20:00

Sports medicine specialist and assistant clinical professor in the department of orthopaedic surgery at New York University School of Medicine Dr. Victor Khabie offers tips on preventing wrestling related injury. Carmel, NY (PRWEB) January 30, 2012 Wrestling as a sport can be traced back to the ancient Olympics and has been practiced throughout the world in many forms and styles ever since. Today, wrestling is offered at various levels, from youth wrestling in middle school through high...

2012-01-11 21:28:13

The chemotherapy drugs required to push a common form of adult leukemia into remission may contribute to DNA damage that can lead to a relapse of the disease in some patients, findings of a new study suggest. The research, by a team of physicians and scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is published Jan. 11 in the advance online edition of Nature. For patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), initial treatment with chemotherapy is essential for putting...

2012-01-11 07:00:00

Broadcaster Tavis Smiley and his All-Star Panel to Discuss at Remaking America, January 12, 2012 BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Jan. 11, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A large and growing number of Americans are poor, or at risk of becoming poor, as a result of the Great Recession of 2007-09, and many will continue to struggle during the recovery, according to a White Paper released today by broadcaster Tavis Smiley and the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Titled...

Regular Prostate Screenings Won't Reduce Cancer-Related Death Risk
2012-01-07 06:30:48

Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis claim to have discovered new evidence suggesting that obtaining an annual prostate cancer screening does not reduce mortality rate associated with the disease in older men. The study, which was published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) on Friday, looked at approximately 76,000 men between the ages of 55 and 74 participating in the Prostate, Lung, Cancer, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO)...

Gene Could Helps Scientists Understand Genetic Deafness
2012-01-04 14:17:59

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine report they have found new clues that may help scientists understand the genetic causes of deafness. The gene FGF20 has been associated with inherited deafness in otherwise healthy families.  The FGF20 gene codes for one member of a family of proteins known as fibroblast growth factors. Members of this family are known to play important and broad roles in embryonic development, tissue maintenance and wound healing. "When we...

2011-12-15 14:33:18

Scientists have uncovered a critical genetic mutation in some patients with myelodysplastic syndromes – a group of blood cancers that can progress to a fatal form of leukemia. The research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis also found evidence that patients with the mutation are more likely to develop acute leukemia. While this finding needs to be confirmed in additional patients, the study raises the prospect that a genetic test could one day more...

2011-12-14 14:47:41

Physicians can use medical records to track the quality of cancer care and determine whether their patients are receiving the right treatments at the right time. Yet the patient is the only one who ultimately can evaluate the quality of his or her experience while receiving treatment. In "Quality Measurement and System Change of Cancer Care Delivery," published in the Regenstrief Conference supplement to the December 2011 issue of the journal Medical Care, investigators from the...

2011-12-02 12:49:20

Sustained changes in the region of the brain associated with cognitive function and emotional control were found in young adult men after one week of playing violent video games, according to study results presented by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. This is the first time the IU researchers, who have studied the effects of media violence for more than a decade, have conducted an experimental study that...

Violent Video Game Alters Cognitive Function In Brain
2011-12-01 05:56:52

According to a new study, violent video game play in young adult men may alter cognitive function and emotional control after a week of game play. The study asked 22 healthy adult males ages 18 to 29 who had low past exposure to violent video games to take part in the research. The researchers assigned two groups of 11 men.  Members of the first group were instructed to play a shooting game for 10 hours at home for a week and refrain from playing the following week.  The...