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Latest University School Stories

2013-04-12 13:30:19

Using a miniature electronic device implanted in the brain, scientists have tapped into the internal reward system of mice, prodding neurons to release dopamine, a chemical associated with pleasure. The researchers, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, developed tiny devices, containing light emitting diodes (LEDs) the size of individual neurons. The devices activate brain cells with light. The scientists report their...

2013-03-08 23:03:13

William (Bill) Marler, the Seattle attorney who represents victims of foodborne illness, is one of four honorees who will receive recognition at the Seattle University School of Law 40th Anniversary Celebration next month. Seattle, WA (PRWEB) March 08, 2013 William (Bill) Marler is one of four honorees who will receive recognition at the Seattle University School of Law 40th Anniversary Celebration next month. Marler will receive the Distinguished Law Graduate Award at a reception to be...

Altered Gene Linked To Some Autism Behaviors
2013-02-13 09:25:54

Washington University School of Medicine Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a genetic mutation that may underlie common behaviors seen in some people with autism, such as difficulty communicating and resistance to change. An error in the gene, CELF6, leads to disturbances in serotonin, a chemical that relays messages in the brain and has long been suspected to be involved in autism. The researchers identified the error in a child with...

New Genetic Fingerprint Resides In Your Belly
2012-12-06 12:35:08

Washington University School of Medicine Our bodies contain far more microbial genes than human genes. And a new study suggests that just as human DNA varies from person to person, so too does the massive collection of microbial DNA in the intestine. The research is the first to catalog the genetic variation of microbes that live in the gut, where they extract nutrients from food, synthesize vitamins, protect against infections, and produce compounds that naturally reduce inflammation....

Drugs That Limit Excess Mucus Could Save Lives
2012-11-26 19:53:34

Washington University School of Medicine Respiratory conditions that restrict breathing such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common killers worldwide. But no effective treatments exist to address the major cause of death in these conditions — excess mucus production. "There is good evidence that what kills people with severe COPD or asthma is mucus obstructing the airway," says Michael J. Holtzman, MD, the Selma and Herman Seldin Professor of...

2012-10-22 22:57:07

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a key difference in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and those who are cognitively normal but still have brain plaques that characterize this type of dementia. "There is a very interesting group of people whose thinking and memory are normal, even late in life, yet their brains are full of amyloid beta plaques that appear to be identical to what's seen in Alzheimer's disease," says David L. Brody,...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'