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Latest University School Stories

2012-05-15 09:24:00

Current colorectal cancer screening guidelines for individuals with first-degree relatives with precancerous colon polyps are based on studies that were not properly designed or were too limited to shape those guidelines, according to a new systemic review of research on the topic. The review authors call for new studies to measure the risk and identify the factors that modify it. "We found that most studies that are cited for the risk for colorectal cancer when first-degree relatives --...

2012-05-14 02:27:05

CINCINNATI, May 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Streamline Health Solutions, Inc. (NasdaqCM: STRM), a leading provider of enterprise content management and business analytics solutions for healthcare organizations, today announced that Boston Medical Center (BMC), a 508-bed academic medical center and current Streamline Health client, has signed an additional five-year agreement to license the Company's solutions for use in the network's 19 physician group practices. This agreement...

2012-05-07 20:15:42

Results of a new study demonstrate the feasibility of a novel strategy in drug discovery: screening large numbers of existing drugs – often already approved for other uses – to see which ones activate genes that boost natural immunity. Using an automated, high-volume screening technique, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a cancer drug that enhances an important natural response to viral infection in human cells. "Over many...

2012-05-07 11:06:57

Brain networks may avoid traffic jams at their busiest intersections by communicating on different frequencies, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University Medical Center at Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University of Tübingen have learned. "Many neurological and psychiatric conditions are likely to involve problems with signaling in brain networks," says co-author Maurizio Corbetta, MD, the Norman J. Stupp Professor of Neurology at...

2012-05-03 09:48:12

A drug prescribed for Alzheimer's disease does not ease clinically significant agitation in patients, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the U.K., U.S. and Norway. This is the first randomized controlled trial designed to assess the effectiveness of the drug (generic name memantine) for significant agitation in Alzheimer's patients. Previous studies suggested memantine could help reduce agitation and improve cognitive functions such as memory. Led by the University of...

2012-04-19 10:26:21

FORT WORTH, Texas, April 19, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- David Cistola, M.D., Ph.D., has been named vice president for research at the UNT Health Science Center, announced President Scott Ransom. Cistola currently serves as associate dean for research and professor of clinical laboratory science in the College of Allied Health Sciences; and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. He also served for 18 years on...

First Gene Linked To Common Form Of Psoriasis Identified
2012-04-19 11:40:06

Scientists led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the first gene directly linked to the most common form of psoriasis, a chronic skin condition. The research shows that rare mutations in the CARD14 gene, when activated by an environmental trigger, can lead to plaque psoriasis. This type of psoriasis accounts for 80 percent of all cases and is characterized by dry, raised, red patches covered with silvery scales that can be itchy and painful. The new...

2012-04-04 12:19:11

Working in mice, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have devised a treatment that prevents the optic nerve injury that occurs in glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease that is a leading cause of blindness. Researchers increased the resistance of optic nerve cells to damage by repeatedly exposing the mice to low levels of oxygen similar to those found at high altitudes. The stress of the intermittent low-oxygen environment induces a protective response called...

2012-04-02 15:50:49

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are using powerful DNA sequencing technology not only to identify mutations at the root of a patient's tumor — considered key to personalizing cancer treatment — but to map the genetic evolution of disease and monitor response to treatment. "We're finding clinically relevant information in the tumor samples we're sequencing for discovery-oriented research studies," says Elaine Mardis, PhD, co-director of The...

2012-03-20 02:24:02

- Donors Respond to the Alzheimer's Association's Call for Funding to Accelerate Discovery - CHICAGO, March 20, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Alzheimer's Association announced today the awarding of its largest ever research grant - nearly $4.2 million dollars over four years - to the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network-Therapeutic Trials Unit (DIAN-TTU), based at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, to enable the program to move forward more quickly with...