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Latest Unsolved problems in neuroscience Stories

2011-09-28 12:43:27

In an advance toward a much-needed early diagnostic test for Alzheimer's disease (AD), scientists have discovered that older women destined to develop AD have high blood levels of a protein linked to pregnancy years before showing symptoms. Their report appears in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research. Theo Luider and colleagues explain that more than 26 million people worldwide already have AD, and the numbers are rising with the graying of the population. Doctors can prescribe any of several...

2011-09-27 12:58:18

Up-and-down cycle flattens as age disrupts pattern A marker for Alzheimer's disease rises and falls in the spinal fluid in a daily pattern that echoes the sleep cycle, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found. The pattern is strongest in healthy young people and reinforces a link between increased Alzheimer's risk and inadequate sleep that had been discovered in animal models. The brain's relative inactivity during sleep may provide an opportunity...

2011-09-25 07:00:00

The ALS Association is hosting a walk in New Britain, Connecticut on Saturday, September 24, 2011 to raise funds to find the cure for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Wallingford, CT (PRWEB) September 25, 2011 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrigâs disease, is a motor neuron disease that affects people from all walks of life and can yield tragic side effects and eventually can even lead to death. This is why The ALS Association of Connecticut is hosting their...

2011-09-23 07:19:54

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Human genetic mutations are not at all like comic books make it out to be.  Scientists have identified a new human genetic mutation as the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).  This mutation explains at least a third of all familial cases of ALS and FTD within the European population.  The research provides key insights into ALS and FTD and may pave the way for development of therapeutic strategies for...

Genetic Mutation Linked To Lou Gehrig's Disease And Dementia
2011-09-22 05:00:53

   Scientists have identified a new human genetic mutation that is responsible for the most common cause of Lou Gehrig's disease and dementia. The researchers performed a genetic analysis and determined that a genetic mutation in the gene C9ORF72 was found in almost 12 percent of all dementia patients in the study and over 22 percent in all amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease patients. "This finding has the potential to lead to significant insights...

2011-09-21 19:09:39

Brain disorder accounts for 1 in 4 cases No cure exists for frontotemporal dementia, which strikes between the ages of 40 and 64 and accounts for at least one in four cases of early-onset dementia. Caused by the death of cells in the front and sides of the brain, the disease can lead to dramatic changes in a patient's personality and behavior, including the loss of the ability to communicate. Now UCLA scientists have discovered that a key signaling pathway plays an important role in the...

2011-09-19 05:23:56

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- High cholesterol may be clogging more than just the heart.  In a recent study, people with high cholesterol may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. "We found that high, cholesterol levels were significantly related to brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease," study author, Kensuke Sasaki, MD, Ph.D, of Kyushu University of Fukoka, Japan, was quoted as saying. The cholesterol levels were tested for 2,587 people between the ages of 40...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'