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Latest Unsolved problems in neuroscience Stories

2012-03-23 05:42:35

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- Why do we see distinct patterns of brain damage linked to diseases such as Alzheimer's? Questions like this baffled researchers for years. Until recently models for predicting regional neurodegeneration in humans has remained a mystery. Having an answer to this information is useful because it can predict memory decline in patients and help find solutions to treat their needs. Variations of dementias involve specific parts of the brain, and previous theories state...

Holding A Gun Causes People To Think Others Are Holding Guns, Too
2012-03-22 13:05:35

New and interesting research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that wielding a gun causes that person to see guns in the hands of others. Professor of Psychology James Brockmole specializes in human cognition and behavior at Notre Dame. Along with a colleague from Purdue University, Brockmole conducted the study to determine how individuals perceive their environments in relation to their actions. The results of this study will appear in an upcoming issue of Journal of...

2012-03-21 21:24:47

Weill Cornell scientists say the program might help patients manage their disease Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have developed a computer program that has tracked the manner in which different forms of dementia spread within a human brain. They say their mathematic model can be used to predict where and approximately when an individual patient's brain will suffer from the spread, neuron to neuron, of "prion-like" toxic proteins -- a process they say underlies all forms of...

2012-03-21 15:26:00

Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia may spread within nerve networks in the brain by moving directly between connected neurons, instead of in other ways proposed by scientists, such as by propagating in all directions, according to researchers who report the finding in the March 22 edition of the journal Neuron. Led by neurologist and MacArthur Foundation "genius award" recipient William Seeley, MD, from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, and post-doctoral fellow Helen Juan...

2012-03-21 15:18:36

Two breakthrough studies may explain why we see distinct patterns of brain damage associated with dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease, and could be useful for predicting future cognitive decline in patients. These independent studies published by Cell Press in the March 22 issue of the journal Neuron, one studying how brain circuits wire up structurally and the other studying their functional connections, converged on a remarkably similar model that predicted the landscape of degeneration...

2012-03-21 00:34:44

New research in humans published today reveals that the so-called FKBP52 protein may prevent the Tau protein from turning pathogenic. This may prove significant for the development of new Alzheimer's drugs and for detecting the disease before the onset of clinical symptoms. A study published online today in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, for the first time demonstrates that the FKBP52 protein, discovered by Prof. Etienne BAULIEU twenty years ago, may prevent hyperphosphorylation of...

2012-03-15 05:40:15

(Ivanhoe Newswire) A new study shows that a new drug, called epothilone D (EpoD) is preventing neurological damage and improving cognitive performance in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, led by first author Bin Zhang, MD, PhD, senior research investigator, and senior author Kurt R. Brunden, PhD, Director of Drug Discovery at the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR), administered...

2012-03-14 09:42:29

For every individual who's a victim of Alzheimer's – some 5.4 million persons in the United States alone – there's a related victim: the caregiver. Spouse, son, daughter, other relative or friend, the loneliness, exhaustion, fear and most of all stress and depression takes a toll While care for the caregivers is difficult to find, a new study out of UCLA suggests that using yoga to engage in very brief, simple daily meditation can lead to improved cognitive functioning and...

2012-03-12 12:00:00

750,000-Person Study Reveals Tips to Better Brain Health for Brain Awareness Week San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) March 12, 2012 In honor of Brain Awareness Week, Lumosity, the leader in online brain training, today announced results from its brain health survey on how sleep, exercise and alcohol consumption correlate to cognitive abilities. The study used online tests of memory, speed and problem-solving to map how cognitive performance relates to healthy (or unhealthy) lifestyles. The survey...

2012-03-13 22:36:44

A study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that the compound epothilone D (EpoD) is effective in preventing further neurological damage and improving cognitive performance in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The results establish how the drug might be used in early-stage AD patients. Investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, led by first author Bin Zhang, MD, PhD, senior research investigator, and senior author...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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