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Ununpentium New Member Periodic Table
2013-08-28 10:18:09

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The periodic table of the elements may soon get a new member. A team of Swedish researchers at Lund University have proven the existence of element 115, temporarily dubbed "ununpentium.” The synthesized element was first discovered by a team of American and Russian scientists who claim they made the element in their lab in 2004. The Lund team says that they have confirmed the element’s existence, but that it is still difficult...

Names Chosen For Elements 114 And 116
2011-12-02 12:22:03

On Thursday, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) proposed new names for elements 114 and 116. A collaboration of scientists from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) said that the name Flerovium for element 114 and Livermorium for element 116 were chosen to fit the latest heavy elements. The IUPAC officially accepted elements 114 and 116 as the heaviest elements in June 2011, ten years since...

2010-10-26 22:33:45

Moving Closer to Understanding the Island of Stability A team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has detected six isotopes, never seen before, of the superheavy elements 104 through 114. Starting with the creation of a new isotope of the yet-to-be-named element 114, the researchers observed successive emissions of alpha particles that yielded new isotopes of copernicium (element 112), darmstadtium (element 110), hassium (element 108),...

2010-06-23 01:36:07

One of the heaviest elements At GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, an international team of scientists succeeded in the observation of the chemical element 114, one of the heaviest elements created until now. The production of element 114 is very difficult and requires dedicated particle accelerators. So far, this feat was achieved at only two other research centers, in the USA and Russia. In the experiment at GSI, scientists employed the innovative new setup TASCA (TransActinide...

2009-09-29 09:20:45

U.S. scientists say they have confirmed the production of the superheavy element 114, 10 years after a Russian group first claimed to have made it. The researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, led by University of California-Berkeley Professor Heino Nitsche and and Berekely Lab senior staff scientist Ken Gregorich, independently confirmed the production of the new element, which was first published by the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator group....

2009-09-25 06:06:15

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been able to confirm the production of the superheavy element 114, ten years after a group in Russia, at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, first claimed to have made it. The search for 114 has long been a key part of the quest for nuclear science's hoped-for Island of Stability. Heino Nitsche, head of the Heavy Element Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group in Berkeley Lab's Nuclear Science...

2006-10-17 09:45:00

WASHINGTON -- Revisiting one of physics' most embarrassing cases of scientific misconduct, researchers from Russia and the United States announced Monday that they have created a new super-heavy element, atomic number 118. Scientists said they smashed together calcium with the manmade element Californium to make an atom with 118 protons in its nucleus. The new element lasted for just one millisecond, but it was the heaviest element ever made and the first manmade inert gas - the atomic family...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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