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Latest Upper Paleolithic Stories

Sophisticated Blade Production Much Earlier Than Originally Thought
2011-10-17 09:21:47

Blade manufacturing "production lines" existed as much as 400,000 years ago, say TAU researchers Archaeology has long associated advanced blade production with the Upper Palaeolithic period, about 30,000-40,000 years ago, linked with the emergence of Homo Sapiens and cultural features such as cave art. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University have uncovered evidence which shows that "modern" blade production was also an element of Amudian industry during the late Lower Paleolithic period,...

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2011-05-11 06:35:00

Researchers have new evidence that suggest Neanderthals died out much earlier than previously thought, and possibly before modern humans arrived. Carbon-dated Neanderthal remains from a cave in the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains in Russia were found to be 10,000 years older than previous research had suggested. The new evidence contradicts the popular theory that Neanderthals and modern humans interacted for thousands of years before the archaic species became extinct. Instead, the...

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2011-04-25 11:30:00

Known today for its bloody conflicts and instability, Somalia's little known history can be found in the colorful cave paintings of animals and humans discovered in 2002 by a French archaeology team. Laas Gaal, Somalia (also known as Laas Geel), just outside of Haregeisa, the capital of Somalia's self-declared Somaliland state, contains 10 caves that show vivid depictions of a pastoralist history which dates back to some 5,000 years or more, reports AFP. A French archaeology team was sent in...

2011-02-15 13:08:19

That human evolution follows a progressive trajectory is one of the most deeply-entrenched assumptions about our species. This assumption is often expressed in popular media by showing cavemen speaking in grunts and monosyllables (the GEICO Cavemen being a notable exception). But is this assumption correct? Were the earliest humans significantly different from us? In a paper published in the latest issue of Current Anthropology, archaeologist John Shea (Stony Brook University) shows they...

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2010-03-26 13:50:00

This question isn't new, but for years anthropologists, archaeologists and historians of art understood these artistic manifestations as purely aesthetic and decorative motives. Eduardo Palacio-P©rez, researcher at the University of Cantabria (UC), now reveals the origins of a theory that remains nowadays/lasts into our days. "This theory is does not originate with the prehistorians, in other words, those who started to develop the idea that the art of primitive peoples was linked...

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2009-05-21 15:50:00

Did cannibalism cause Neanderthals to become extinct? A scientist at France's National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) seems to believe so. Fernando Rozzi reported in the Journal of Anthropological Sciences that humans devoured Neanderthals into extinction during the Stone Age some 30,000 years ago. Rozzi's claim is based on analysis of a Neanderthal jawbone that had apparently been butchered by modern humans. The jawbone, which could be the first evidence of contact between the two...

2009-05-14 10:36:12

An ivory figurine thought to be 40,000 years old may hold clues to the origins of art, an expert says. The figurine of a woman measures nearly 2.4 inches in height and has been tabbed the earliest 3-D artistic representation of humans, the Los Angeles Times said Thursday. Archaeologist Daniel Adler of the University of Connecticut said the figurine found in a cave in Germany's Swabian Jura region by archaeologist Nicholas J. Conard should offer valuable insights into the history of both art...

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2009-05-14 07:45:00

German anthropologists believe they may have found the oldest man-made representation of a human figure in the form of a grotesquely exaggerated sculpture of a female body.The roughly 3-inch tall figurine carved of mammoth ivory portrays a woman with disproportionately large breasts, prominent buttocks and very pronounced genitals.  The artifact, which has been dubbed the Venus of Hohle Fels, was discovered in an ongoing excavation in southwestern Germany.  Based on the results of...

2006-03-09 09:25:01

15,000-year-old remains suggest a shift away from coarser foods HealthDay News -- A nearly complete 13,000- to 15,000-year-old skeleton of a woman has the oldest recorded case of impacted wisdom teeth ever documented, say scientists at the Field Museum in Chicago. The teeth may also point to a key shift in human nutrition. For years, it was believed that Magdalenian Girl, excavated in France in 1911, was a girl because her wisdom teeth had not erupted. Wisdom teeth usually come in between 18...

2006-02-07 09:53:02

PARIS (AP) - Cave drawings thought to be older than those in the famed caves of Lascaux have been discovered in a grotto in western France, officials from the Charente region said Sunday. A first analysis by officials from the office of cultural affairs suggests the drawings were made some 25,000 years ago, Henri de Marcellus, mayor of the town of Vilhonneur where the cave is located, told France-Info radio. He said, however, that the date could only be confirmed by further investigations....


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'