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Latest Uranium depletion Stories

2012-08-23 00:30:03

PNNL tests adsorbent to extract uranium from the ocean When you take a dip in the ocean, nuclear fuel is probably the farthest thing from your mind. Uranium floats in Earth´s oceans in trace amounts of just 3 parts per billion, but it adds up. Combined, our oceans hold up to 4.5 billion tons of uranium — enough to potentially fuel the world´s nuclear power plantsfor 6,500 years. Countries such as Japan have examined the ocean as a uranium source since the 1960s, but...

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2012-08-21 22:25:18

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The sea holds 4 billion tons of the Earth's uranium, and scientists say they have made advances in finding a way to tap that source. Reporting at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, Robin Rogers, PhD., and colleagues from the University of Alabama, say they are making progress towards the 40-year-old dream of tapping the sea for uranium. The scientists have developed promising...

2010-09-15 09:00:00

TSX.V: TU www.tigrisuranium.com VANCOUVER, Sept. 15 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Tigris Uranium Corp. (TSX.V: TU) ("Tigris" or the" Company") is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Douglas Underhill as the Company's Chief Geologist. "I am extremely pleased to be working with Dr. Underhill again," said Chairman and Chief Executive Officer William M. Sheriff. "Doug was an essential member of our team with Energy Metals Corp. and we look forward to his invaluable expertise in building...

2010-05-26 03:00:00

LONDON, May 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Uranium supply will supposedly grow by an average of 5% annually until 2015, but drop thereafter as reserves are exhausted. Uranium demand is projected to be growing by an average of 4.4% per year during the next 20 years. The increase in demand is caused mostly by China - over the next two decades it will be the world leader in building new reactors. The Uranium Market Review 2010 has been recently added by Market Publishers, Ltd. The report focuses on a...

2009-09-07 08:19:13

Using bacteria and inositol phosphate, a chemical analogue of a cheap waste material from plants, researchers at Birmingham University have recovered uranium from the polluted waters from uranium mines. The same technology can also be used to clean up nuclear waste. Professor Lynne Macaskie, this week (7-10 September), presented the group's work to the Society for General Microbiology's meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. Bacteria, in this case, E. coli, break down a source of...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.