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Latest USA 193 Stories

2008-08-26 12:01:16

The U.S. Navy's February missile shoot down of a spy satellite was unnecessary, a Harvard scientist and former NASA employee said. Yousaf Butt filed a Freedom of Information Act request asking for the National Air and Space Agency's re-entry threat analysis from the disabled USA-193 satellite. His conclusions contradict the government's official explanation that the satellite's hydrazine fuel tank posed a health hazard. Butt described government modeling as oversimplified and biased...

2008-08-01 18:00:06

To: TECHNOLOGY EDITORS Contact: William Jeffs of NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, +1- 281-483-5111, william.p.jeffs@nasa.gov HOUSTON, Aug. 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Nicholas Johnson, NASA chief scientist for orbital debris, has received the Department of Defense Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his critical contributions to the successful interception of a non-functional DoD satellite. The award was presented July 30 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston by Gen....

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2008-03-20 00:00:00

Commanders of the U.S. Navy's mission to shoot down a malfunctioning spy satellite last month said there was no substantial new space debris created.  Rear Admiral Alan Hicks, head of the Pentagon's Aegis ballistic missile defense program, said all but small pieces of debris had burned upon re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere.  "We thought there would be much larger pieces," he said. Hicks' made the announcement during a briefing at an annual conference of the U.S. Navy...

2008-02-28 17:29:32

This story was updated at 3:34 p.m. EST. The planned Friday launch of a new U.S. spy satellite has been delayed by space debris from last week's destruction of its disabled predecessor, the mission's launch provider said Wednesday. Initially slated for a Feb. 29 liftoff from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the National Reconnaissance Office's classified NROL-28 reconnaissance spacecraft will stand down for at least two weeks to avoid the orbiting remains of the destroyed...

2008-02-26 09:01:16

Pentagon analysis indicates satellite fuel tank hit WASHINGTON, Feb. 25 (Xinhua) -- The Department of Defense announced here on Monday that based on debris analysis, officials are confident the missile intercept and destruction of an out-of-control spy satellite, achieved the objective of destroying the toxical fuel tank. A modified tactical SM-3 missile was launched by the USS Lake Erie, positioned northwest of Hawaii, at 10:26 p.m. EST on Feb. 20,to shoot down the defunct satellite....

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2008-02-21 07:35:00

A U.S. Navy cruiser blasted a disabled spy satellite with a pinpoint missile strike that achieved the main mission of exploding a tank of toxic fuel 130 miles above the Pacific Ocean, defense officials said. Destroying the satellite's onboard tank of about 1,000 pounds of hydrazine fuel was the primary goal, and a senior defense official close to the mission said Thursday that it appears the tank was destroyed, and the strike with a specially designed missile was a complete success. Defense...

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2008-02-20 00:00:00

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. military likely will make its first effort to shoot down a crippled spy satellite that's approaching Earth's atmosphere sometime after 9:30 p.m. Eastern time on Wednesday, the Pentagon announced Tuesday, in what will be a major, if unplanned, test of America's anti-ballistic missile program. The USS Lake Erie, a Ticonderoga class missile cruiser with an Aegis weapons system, will launch an SM-3 tactical missile toward the satellite from somewhere west of Hawaii,...

2008-02-19 12:55:00

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. military has issued aircraft advisories for a large area of the Pacific Ocean for the evenings of Feb. 20 and Feb. 21, setting off speculation that it will attempt to shoot down a wayward U.S. spy satellite on one or both of those nights. During a press conference Feb. 14 announcing plans to try to down the satellite as a safety measure, senior U.S. government officials said the attempt would occur somewhere over the Pacific during a several-day window that opens when...

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2008-01-26 17:15:00

A large U.S. spy satellite has lost power and could hit the Earth in late February or March, government officials said Saturday. The satellite, which no longer can be controlled, could contain hazardous materials, and it is unknown where on the planet it might come down, they said. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the information is classified as secret. "Appropriate government agencies are monitoring the situation," said Gordon Johndroe, a spokesman for the National...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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