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Latest UT Southwestern Medical Center Stories

2013-08-14 23:20:24

Dallas plastic surgeon, Dr. Jeffrey M. Kenkel, to direct one of the largest, most competitive, plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) August 14, 2013 Dallas plastic surgeon, Jeffrey M. Kenkel, M.D., Professor and Vice-Chairman of the Department of Plastic Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been appointed as the new Program Director for the Plastic Surgery Residency Program at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center....

2013-07-29 16:18:27

A seafood contaminant that thrives in brackish water during the summer works like a spy to infiltrate cells and quickly open communication channels to sicken the host, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center report. Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacteria, which cause gastroenteritis, inject proteins called effectors into host cells. One of those effectors, VopQ, almost immediately starts to disrupt the important process of autophagy via a novel channel-forming mechanism, the scientists...

2013-07-10 19:27:25

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center report the identification of a new cellular source for an important disease-fighting protein used in the body's earliest response to infection. The protein interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) keeps viruses from replicating and stimulates the immune system to produce other disease-fighting agents. Neutrophils, the newly identified cellular source of the protein, are the major component of the pus that forms around injured tissue. The...

2013-04-22 10:00:41

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that alternative splicing — a process that allows a single gene to code for multiple proteins — appears to be a new potential target for anti-telomerase cancer therapy. The enzyme telomerase is overexpressed in almost all cancer cells, and previous research efforts have failed to identify good telomerase inhibitors. The study by Dr. Woodring Wright and UT Southwestern colleagues in the April 4 issue of Cell Reports...

2013-04-17 18:38:13

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a specific gene that regulates the heart's ability to regenerate after injuries. The function of the gene, called Meis1, in the heart was not known previously. The findings of the UTSW investigation are available online in Nature. "We found that the activity of the Meis1 gene increases significantly in heart cells soon after birth, right around the time heart muscle cells stop dividing. Based on this observation we asked a...

2013-04-04 15:57:33

Physician-researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a vulnerability of certain lung-cancer cells — a specific genetic weakness that can be exploited for new therapies. Although researchers have long known that mutant versions of the KRAS gene drive tumor formation and are key to cell survival in non-small cell lung cancer, the blocking of activated KRAS has proven difficult. For years, investigations have explored stopping lung cancer at this junction, which also...

Genetic Vulnerability Of Lung Cancer To Lay Foundation For New Therapies
2013-04-04 13:40:06

UT Southwestern Medical Center Physician-researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a vulnerability of certain lung-cancer cells — a specific genetic weakness that can be exploited for new therapies. Although researchers have long known that mutant versions of the KRAS gene drive tumor formation and are key to cell survival in non-small cell lung cancer, the blocking of activated KRAS has proven difficult. For years, investigations have explored stopping lung...

2013-02-14 23:01:20

Dallas plastic surgeon, Dr. Rod J. Rohrich of UT Southwestern Medical Center, shares streamlined approach to neck lifts, with goal of better, more consistent outcomes. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) February 14, 2013 In a London, England, address to colleagues at the annual meeting of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), Dallas plastic surgeon, Dr. Rod Rohrich, introduced an algorithmic process for the management of necklifts. The process is based on...

2012-08-29 10:22:36

Being physically fit during your 30s, 40s, and 50s not only helps extend lifespan, but it also increases the chances of aging healthily, free from chronic illness, investigators at UT Southwestern Medical Center and The Cooper Institute have found. For decades, research has shown that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels lessen the risk of death, but it previously had been unknown just how much fitness might affect the burden of chronic disease in the most senior years — a concept...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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