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Latest UT Southwestern Medical Center Stories

2011-11-10 12:00:00

Dr. Rohrich will address NYUâs Institute of Reconstructive Surgery on pioneering work that makes it easier to address revision rhinoplasty. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) November 10, 2011 Dr. Rod Rohrich, chair of the department of plastic and reconstructive surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will be the New York University Langone Medical Centerâs âœV.J. Kazanjian Visiting Professorship in Plastic Surgery.â The professorship...

2011-10-25 13:11:21

A simple blood test could someday quantify a smoker's lung toxicity and danger of heart disease, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. Nearly one in five adults in the U.S. smoke, and smoking-related medical expenses and loss of productivity exceeds $167 billion annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Levels of a lung protein found in the blood of smokers could indicate their risk of dangerous plaque buildup in blood vessels, said Dr....

2011-10-20 09:32:37

The intestinal ecosystem is even more dynamic than previously thought, according to two studies by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers published in the latest issue of Science. Taken together, these studies provide a new understanding of the unique intestinal environment and suggest new strategies for the prevention of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and viral infections, the researchers said. "Mammals have evolved ways to limit invasion by the naturally occurring bacteria that...

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2011-08-11 13:39:06

People who frequently use tanning beds may be spurred by an addictive neurological reward-and-reinforcement trigger, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a pilot study. This could explain why some people continue to use tanning beds despite the increased risk of developing melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer. The brain activity and corresponding blood flow tracked by UT Southwestern scientists involved in the study is similar to that seen in people addicted to...

2011-08-09 08:03:20

A person's ability to battle viruses at the cellular level remarkably resembles the way deadly infectious agents called prions misfold and cluster native proteins to cause disease, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. This study marks the first discovery of so-called "good" prion-like proteins in human cells and the first to find such proteins involved in innate immunity: the way the body recognizes and responds to threats from viruses or other external agents, said Dr. Zhijian...

2011-07-25 23:38:39

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have narrowed the potential drug targets for advanced prostate cancer by demonstrating that late-stage tumors are driven by a different hormonal pathway than was thought previously. While testosterone is generally known to stimulate the growth of the disease, advanced prostate cancer that is resistant to standard hormonal therapy actually is driven by a pathway that circumvents the male hormone, said Dr. Nima Sharifi, assistant professor of internal...

2011-07-20 12:25:00

DALLAS, July 20, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- UT Southwestern Medical Center's focus on safety and quality of care for its patients has earned its University Hospitals & Clinics a place on the annual "Most Wired" list by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine. "This recognition from the flagship publication of the American Hospital Association is the latest acknowledgement of UT Southwestern's leadership in using information technology to provide better patient care," said Dr....


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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