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Latest Vanderbilt University Stories

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2011-05-10 07:59:54

Scientists working in a laboratory at Vanderbilt University have potentially discovered a class of insect repellent that is 1000 times more effective than DEET and works against all types of insects. "It wasn't something we set out to find," said David Rinker, a graduate student who performed the study in collaboration with graduate student Gregory Pask and post-doctoral fellow Patrick Jones. "It was an anomaly that we noticed in our tests." Reported in the online edition of the Proceedings...

2011-04-19 05:45:00

NASHVILLE, Tenn., April 19, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: CPIX), a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on hospital acute care and gastroenterology markets, today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire the rights to ifetroban, a new Phase II development product. The Company has initiated clinical development under the brand name Hepatoren(TM) (ifetroban) Injection and is evaluating the product for the treatment of critically ill...

2011-04-14 14:29:00

IRVINE, Calif., April 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Freedom Innovations, a company that specializes in the development of high technology lower extremity prosthetic devices, today announced a worldwide licensing agreement. The agreement grants the company exclusive rights to commercialize the world's first lower extremity prosthesis with actively powered knee and ankle joints that operate synergistically. Developed at the Vanderbilt University Center for Intelligent Mechatronics in Nashville,...

2011-04-04 20:05:20

Vanderbilt University researchers have identified a new gene that can influence a person's risk for developing epilepsy. The findings, reported in the March 29 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could improve molecular diagnostic tools and point to novel therapeutic targets for epilepsy. The gene, KCNV2, codes for a unique type of potassium channel, a protein that participates in the electrical activity of nerve cells. Disturbed electrical activity in the brain "“ and...

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2011-03-16 09:06:47

By David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University If the latest theory of Tom Weiler and Chui Man Ho is right, the Large Hadron Collider "“ the world's largest atom smasher that started regular operation last year "“ could be the first machine capable of causing matter to travel backwards in time. "Our theory is a long shot," admitted Weiler, who is a physics professor at Vanderbilt University, "but it doesn't violate any laws of physics or experimental constraints." One of the major...

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2011-03-15 11:49:48

By David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University A new laser technique has demonstrated it can measure the interactions between proteins tangled in a cell's membrane and a variety of other biological molecules. These extremely difficult measurements can aid the process of drug discovery. Scientists estimate that about 30 percent of the 7,000 proteins in a human cell reside in the cell's membrane, and that these membrane proteins initiate 60 to 70 percent of the signals that control the operation of...

2010-12-08 02:20:37

Are you ready for robots in the ER? A group of computer engineers at Vanderbilt University is convinced that the basic technology is now available to create robot assistants that can perform effectively in the often-chaotic environment of the emergency room. The specialists in emergency medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center are enthusiastic about the potential advantages. So, the two groups have formed an interdisciplinary team to explore the use of robotics in this critical and...

2010-12-06 14:07:33

The season in which babies are born can have a dramatic and persistent effect on how their biological clocks function. That is the conclusion of a new study published online on Dec. 5 by the journal Nature Neuroscience. The experiment provides the first evidence for seasonal imprinting of biological clocks in mammals and was conducted by Professor of Biological Sciences Douglas McMahon, graduate student Chris Ciarleglio, post-doctoral fellow Karen Gamble and two undergraduate students at...

2010-11-26 08:00:00

SYOSSET, New York, Nov. 26, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Albert F. Moore, of Richmond, Virginia, has been included in the Strathmore's Who's Who Worldwide Edition for his outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of law. ABOUT ALBERT F. MOORE Mr. Moore has 35 years of experience in the legal field. He is currently with Neal and Harwell, PLC, Attorneys at Law, in Nashville, Tennessee, where he has been since 1980. He practices federal white-collar criminal defense/state court...

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2010-10-28 14:25:04

Expert typists are able to zoom across the keyboard without ever thinking about which fingers are pressing the keys. New research from Vanderbilt University reveals that this skill is managed by an autopilot, one that is able to catch errors that can fool our conscious brain. The research was published in the Oct. 29 issue of Science. "We all know we do some things on autopilot, from walking to doing familiar tasks like making coffee and, in this study, typing. What we don't know as...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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