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Latest Variegation Stories

70aa5c8ffbefcada1d6d13b14dde6d491
2009-06-20 08:32:38

German botanists working in the rainforests of Ecuador have discovered a plant that "pretends" to be ill.  The plant fakes its illness to prevent attacks by mining moths, which would eat the plants' otherwise healthy leaves. The discovery is the first known example of a plant that feigns being sick, and might explain a pattern seen on plant leaves known as variegation, which many species of plant exhibit. For a variety of causes, variegated plants have different colored patterns on the...

2008-03-16 09:00:19

Botanical name Liriodendron tulipifera 'Aureomarginatum' Family Magnolia (Magnoliaceae) Category Shade tree Primary uses Specimen Dimensions 60 or more feet tall by 30 to 50 feet across Culture Full sun; prefers a moist, well-drained, deep soil. When young, trees can be pruned as needed to develop shape during the winter. Trees receiving adequate summer moisture generally have few insect or disease problems. Drought- stressed plants often lose leaves prematurely. Bloom time Spring...


Latest Variegation Reference Libraries

Variegated kiwi vine, Actinidia kolomikta
2014-01-04 15:22:59

Actinidia kolomikta is a very hardy, flowering vine species. The species belongs to the Actinidiaceae family and may also be referred to commonly as the Variegated kiwi vine. A. kolomikta can be found in Russia, Korea, Japan and China. Actinidia kolomikta vines are fast-growing and reach between 26 and 33 feet. The plant produces fragrant, white flowers that can be seen blooming in early summer. After flowering the plant produces long, edible kiwifruits in the early fall months.  Its...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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