Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 5:30 EDT

Latest Veneridae Stories

Ancient Clam Gardens Provide Food Security
2014-03-21 11:45:42

[ Watch the Video: Ancient Clam Garden ] Simon Fraser University A three-year study of ancient clam gardens in the Pacific Northwest has led researchers, including three from Simon Fraser University, to make a discovery that could benefit coastal communities’ food production. PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed science journal, has just published their study. Amy Groesbeck, an SFU alumna, SFU professors Anne Salomon, an ecologist, and Dana Lepofsky, an archaeologist, and Kirsten...

20f4daae5bb5f59d8c5bc9e3b65ca81c1
2008-12-03 08:25:11

With their sedentary lifestyles and filter-feeding habits, clams have been silent witnesses to the changes that humans have inflicted upon their waters. These clams are silent no more, as Dr. Ruth H. Carmichael of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and her colleagues have reported in their recent paper in the prestigious journal Aquatic Biology. Using stable isotope techniques, Carmichael demonstrated it is possible to identify and trace wastewater inputs to estuaries and coastal food webs by...

2008-10-16 18:00:15

A U.S. ecologist says he's found a commercially valuable species of clam thriving in oxygen-depleted waters of a so-called "dead zone" off the East Coast. Andrew Altieri, a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University, discovered the population of quahog clams increased in hypoxic zones, defined as areas in which dissolved oxygen in the water has been depleted. He said he determined whether quahog clams have a natural capacity to survive in oxygen-starved waters, but their predators...

6d1669769cb0f3f180d9b333e64cc4551
2008-10-15 10:45:00

Coastal dead zones, an increasing concern to ecologists, the fishing industry and the public, may not be as devoid of life after all. A Brown scientist has found that dead zones do indeed support marine life, and that at least one commercially valuable clam actually benefits from oxygen-depleted waters. Andrew Altieri, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University, studied dead zones in Narragansett Bay, one of the largest estuaries on...

2008-05-18 03:00:16

By Jennifer Smith, Newsday, Melville, N.Y. May 18--Brown tide, the algae that triggered the collapse of Long Island's scallop fishery, has reappeared in the Great South Bay for the first time since 2001 and spread farther west than ever before. The blooming algae has turned water from Patchogue to Massapequa Park a cloudy brown, Suffolk County health officials said. It has not been found farther east, nor in the Peconic or Shinnecock Bays. Aureococcus anophagefferens, the tiny...

2005-07-01 14:02:19

BOSTON (AP) -- Shellfish beds that closed because of an outbreak of toxic red tide algae were reopened in seven coastal communities Friday, just in time for the holiday weekend. State officials said recent tests show the algae bloom has receded and it is safe to fish and harvest certain species of shellfish in Duxbury, Plymouth, Kingston, Bourne, Wareham, Wellfleet and Chatham. The openings come more than a month after the worst red tide in 30 years began its spread through New England...

7db5dd630d893a5f17b1c79627064bfc1
2005-01-19 07:41:18

DARTMOUTH, Mass. (AP) -- The war on terror could have an unlikely ally in a modest mollusk known as the quahog. Researchers who injected the clams with enough botulism toxin to kill 1,000 people found the shellfish somehow neutralized the enzyme, which is considered a potential bioterror agent. "Botulism activity was cut in half by the blood of the quahog," Dr. Bal Ram Singh told The Standard Times of New Bedford in Wednesday's editions. "So we think there is some sort of antidote in this...


Latest Veneridae Reference Libraries

0_3b63b66922502d27c507af9639d21237
2008-04-30 23:02:22

The Hard Clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), also known as the quahog, is a bivalve mollusk native to the eastern shores of North America, from Prince Edward Island to the Yucatan Peninsula. Older sources may give it the systematic name Venus mercenaria. It is one of many unrelated bivalves referred to as clams. Hard clams are quite common throughout New England, north into Canada, and all down the Eastern seaboard of the United States to Florida, but are particularly abundant between Cape Cod and...

More Articles (1 articles) »