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Latest Venom Stories

2009-09-16 10:40:27

While studying a way to more safely and effectively collect snake venom, University of Florida researchers have noticed the venom delivered by an isolated population of Florida cottonmouth snakes may be changing in response to their diet. Scientists used a portable nerve stimulator to extract venom from anesthetized cottonmouths, producing more consistent extraction results and greater amounts of venom, according to findings published in August in the journal Toxicon. The study of venoms is...

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2009-08-17 16:00:00

Researchers in China have discovered the first protein-based toxin in an amphibian "“a 60 amino acid neurotoxin found in the skin of a Chinese tree frog. This finding may help shed more light into both the evolution of amphibians and the evolution of poison.While gene-encoded protein toxins have been identified in many vertebrate animals, including fish, reptiles and mammals, none have yet been found in amphibians or birds. In the case of poisonous amphibians, like the tropical poison...

2009-07-09 16:31:07

A Chinese team of scientists has identified the protein composition of venom from the Scorpiops jendeki scorpion. Wuhan University researchers said their findings -- from the first venom analysis of the arachnid -- uncovered nine novel poison molecules never before seen in a scorpion species. The scientists led by Yibao Ma of the university's Laboratory of Virology studied the sting of S. jendeki, a member of the family Euscorpiidae, which covers Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. Our...

2009-07-01 13:35:00

SAVANNAH, Ga., July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- For some 60 years, fire ants have expanded relentlessly throughout the southern and southwestern United States. They sting relentlessly, too: first biting the victim's skin with their mandibles (mouth parts), then holding on tight and sting from their bottoms. They then often pivot around and continue to sting in circles, causing burning pain and excruciating itch to their victims, many of whom are children. Fire ant venom includes a potent alkaloid...

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2009-07-01 06:26:34

Transcriptomic tests have uncovered the protein composition of venom from the Scorpiops jendeki scorpion. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Genomics have carried out the first ever venom analysis in this arachnid, and discovered nine novel poison molecules, never before seen in any scorpion species. Yibao Ma worked with a team of researchers from Wuhan University, China, to study the sting of S. jendeki, a member of the family Euscorpiidae, which covers Europe, Asia, Africa,...

2009-06-24 09:26:17

Marine biologists in Florida say they have official confirmation the venomous lionfish has spread down the Atlantic Coast to Miami. Divers from Biscayne National Park captured the invader from the Pacific in the bow of a freighter 60 feet below the surface after a sport diver reported sighting a zebra-striped fish, the Miami Herald reported Wednesday. Terry Helmers, a park diver, said it took two dives to find the fish in the scattered debris. We probably all swam past it a couple of times,...

2009-06-13 00:25:43

A janitor at a department store in downtown Melbourne survived a bite by a deadly snake lurking in a dumpster, medical workers say. Paul Bentley, a spokesman for Ambulance-Victoria, said the 29-year-old told emergency workers he was throwing out trash in an alley behind the Myer store when he felt a bite on his finger, The Age reported. He pulled his hand out and saw an 8-inch snake with its fangs in his finger. Workers at St. Vincent's Hospital said they found venom from a brown snake on the...

2009-06-03 16:56:31

A Maryland man bitten by a baby copperhead snake at his apartment inside a Buddhist temple said he prayed for the animal before setting it free. Sam Pettengill, 36, said he assumed the tiny snake was harmless when he found it inside his studio apartment Sunday night at the Kunzang Palyul Choling temple near Poolesville, so he attempted to pick it up, The Washington Post reported Wednesday. He said some friends helped him catch the snake in a vase and identify it as a potentially venomous...

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2009-05-21 12:00:00

Spanish police say they are waiting for a shipment of snake venom antidote before entering a Madrid apartment filled with illegal reptiles. Civil Guard officers in Madrid and zookeepers called in to assist with the operation Wednesday said they are waiting to enter an apartment believed to contain two pythons, five boa constrictors and a rattlesnake, The Times of London reported Thursday. The officers said local hospitals do not stock venom antidotes for non-native snakes and it could take up...

2009-05-21 08:18:47

A study of venomous snails on remote Pacific islands reveals genetic underpinnings of an ecological phenomenon that has fascinated scientists since Darwin. The research, by University of Michigan evolutionary biologists Tom Duda and Taehwan Lee, is scheduled to be published online May 20 in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. In the study, Duda and Lee explored ecological release, a phenomenon thought to be responsible for some of the most dramatic diversifications of living things in Earth's...


Latest Venom Reference Libraries

Solenodon, Solenodontidae
2014-10-01 12:40:57

Solenodontida is a family that holds four species of solenodons, mammals that are known to be venomous, which can be found in Cuba and on the island of Hispaniola. The Hispaniolan solenodon can be found in a variety of habitats including highland forests and lowland dry forests. Both species resemble shrews in that they have long noses, hairless feet, scaly tails and small eyes. They reach an average length between eleven and thirteen inches, with Cuban solenodons often growing smaller than...

Amazonian Giant Centipede, Scolopendra gigantean
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: Puerto Rican Giant Centipede, Scolopendra gigantea; Vieques, Puerto Rico. Credit: Katka Nemčoková/Wikipedia  (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantean), also known as the Peruvian giant yellow-leg centipede, can be found in areas of the Caribbean and South America. Its range includes Saint Thomas, Grenada, Jamaica, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the island of seychelles Puerto Rico, Saint Martin, the Trinidad Islands, and western and northern regions...

Giant Redheaded Centipede, Scolopendra heros
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Scolopendra heros, also referred to as the Giant Redheaded Centipede, calls parts of the southern central and southwestern United States, as well as a significant portion of Mexico, its home. It has not been found west of the Colorado River. Varying in length from 6.5 to 8 inches, its trunk has 21 to 23 pairs of legs. The body is aposematically colored. This is a defensive coloration meant to scare off potential predators. There are several color varients within the species, depending...

Elongate Surgeonfish, Acanthurus mata
2012-04-02 17:23:07

The Elongate Surgeonfish, (Acanthurus mata), is a species of tropical fish found in the Indo-Pacific, and can be found as far north as Southern Japan and south to the Great Barrier Reef. Some also live as far west as South Africa and as far east as the Tuamotu Islands. Its main habitat is steep slopes around coral reefs. This is a light blue fish with numerous brown stripes running down the length of the body, although over time it is able to change color to become blue overall. It has a...

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2009-05-02 21:49:31

The Six-eyed Sand Spider (Sicarius hahni) is a species of arachnid found in southern Africa. It is found mostly in deserts and other sandy areas. The genus name, sicarius, is Latin for "murderer" or "assassin". This species is named after arachnologist Carl Wilhelm Hahn. The binomial name is interpreted as "Hahn's assassin". Due to the flattened stance and position of the legs, this species is also sometimes known as the Six-eyed Crab Spider. Studies of the venom of this spider have led...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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