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Latest Ventromedial prefrontal cortex Stories

2011-11-23 11:45:30

Images of prisoners' brains show important differences between those who are diagnosed as psychopaths and those who aren't, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers. The results could help explain the callous and impulsive anti-social behavior exhibited by some psychopaths. The study showed that psychopaths have reduced connections between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the part of the brain responsible for sentiments such as empathy and...

2011-10-06 11:24:36

Civilized human cohabitation requires us to respect elementary social norms. We guarantee compliance with these norms with our willingness to punish norm violations — often even at our own expense. This behavior goes against our own economic self-interest and requires us to control our egoistic impulses. Innovative combination of methods In collaboration with Professor Ernst Fehr, Dr. Thomas Baumgartner and Professor Daria Knoch reveal the neuronal networks behind self-control in...

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2011-06-04 15:55:00

Research shows morally laden scenarios get different responses from people of different ages.Moral responses change as people age says a new study from the University of Chicago.Both preschool children and adults distinguish between damage done either intentionally or accidently when assessing whether a perpetrator has done something wrong, said study author Jean Decety. But, adults are much less likely than children to think someone should be punished for damaging an object, for example,...

2010-09-20 16:31:00

Narcissists spend their resting time deep in thought, a new imaging study shows, though such reflection likely revolves entirely around the thinker. USC neuroscientists found a correlation between high scores on a measure of narcissism - the Machiavellian Egocentricity subscale - and activity during rest in the posteromedial cortex, a brain region that previous studies have associated with thoughts about the self. The finding, published online by PLoS ONE, does more than bolster a stereotype....

2010-08-25 14:56:10

Humans and other animals use this circuitry to make basic decisions about things like food, discounting the involvement of a specific 'moral sense' Scientists at Harvard University have found that humans can make difficult moral decisions using the same brain circuits as those used in more mundane choices related to money and food. These circuits, also found in other animals, put together two critical pieces of information: How good or bad are the things that might happen? What are the odds...

2010-03-24 16:14:36

New research provides insight into the region of the brain that underlies our tendency to condemn failed attempts to harm and forgive harms that are accidental. The study, published by Cell Press in the March 25 issue of the journal Neuron, underscores the importance of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC) for making moral judgments about harmful intent. Previous neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies implicated the VMPC in emotional responses to harmful actions, where the actor...

2010-03-24 15:35:00

Changes in brain connectivity with aging may enable older adults to remember positive events Milan, Italy -- Despite the aches and pains that occur in old age, many older adults maintain a positive outlook, remembering the positive experiences from their past. A new study, reported in the April 2010 issue of Elsevier's Cortex (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cortex), reveals that older adults' ability to remember the past through a positive lens is linked to the way in which the brain...

2010-03-09 14:58:11

Activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex is an indicator emotion regulation in day-to-day life Common wisdom tells us that for a successful relationship partners shouldn't go to bed angry. But new research from a psychologist at Harvard University suggests that brain activity"”specifically in the region called the lateral prefrontal cortex"”is a far better indicator of how someone will feel in the days following a fight with his or her partner. Individuals who show more neural...

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2010-02-24 15:04:41

Brain images during money-transfer experiments show "rich" participants prefer to see others get financial windfall The human brain is a big believer in equality"”and a team of scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, has become the first to gather the images to prove it. Specifically, the team found that the reward centers in the human brain respond more strongly when a poor person receives a financial reward than when a...

2009-09-30 13:28:14

Half of young patients may outgrow bipolar disorder by age 30, U.S. researchers suggest. The Missouri University study, published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, was based on two large national surveys. Study co-author Kenneth Sher and colleagues say 5.5 percent to 6.2 percent of people between the ages of 18-24 suffer from bipolar disorder, but only about 3 percent of people older than 29 do. Young adults between the ages of 18-24 are going through significant life changes and social...


Word of the Day
ambsace
  • Bad luck; misfortune.
  • The smallest amount possible or the most worthless thing.
The word 'ambsace' comes from a Latin word meaning 'both'.