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Latest Vespoidea Stories

2009-04-01 09:54:09

Ant trails fascinate children and scientists alike. With so many ants traveling in both directions, meeting and contacting one another, carrying their loads and giving the impression that they have a sense of urgency and duty, they pose the following question: how do they organize themselves? A new study published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE may have some answers. Pedro Leite Ribeiro and his colleagues at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, believe they have found...

2009-02-26 18:00:00

Germany scientists have used gas chromatography to determine desert ants use their olfactory sense to find their way without landmarks for guidance. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered desert microhabitats have unique odor signatures that can be used to guide the ants back to their nest. Until now scientists thought the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, which makes its home in the Tunisian desert, was a vision-guided insect. But the researchers -- Kathrin...

2009-02-06 10:59:55

A British scientist says advanced audio technology shows ants talk together frequently while inside their nests. Miniature microphones and speakers placed inside nests allowed scientists to play back sounds made by the queen, which called the ants to attention, The Times of London reported Friday. When we played the queen sounds they did 'en garde' behavior. They would stand motionless with their antennae held out and their jaws apart for hours -- the moment anyone goes near they will attack,...

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2009-01-21 16:00:00

Penn State Assistant Professor of Biology Tracy Langkilde has shown that native fence lizards in the southeastern United States are adapting to potentially fatal invasive fire-ant attacks by developing behaviors that enable them to escape from the ants, as well as by developing longer hind legs, which can increase the effectiveness of this behavior. "Not only does this finding provide biologists with an example of evolution in action, but it also provides wildlife managers with knowledge that...

2009-01-20 13:47:41

Scientists say they've discovered U.S. fence lizards in the southeastern United States are evolving to avoid potentially fatal attacks by fire ants. Penn State Assistant Professor Tracy Langkilde said she's determined the lizards are adapting by developing behaviors that enable them to escape from the ants, as well developing longer hind legs that can increase the effectiveness of their behavior. Not only does this finding provide biologists with an example of evolution in action, but it also...

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2009-01-12 07:40:00

A study found that ants exhibit competitive, destructive behavior within worker ant colonies when one of their own tries to reproduce. This behavior is only displayed when there is a queen in the colony. Experts found worker ants typically give up reproducing to care for the queen's offspring, who are also their brothers and sisters. However, a US-German team of researchers found that chemicals produced by the sneaky ants gave away their fertility status. The findings are published in the...

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2008-11-20 10:08:03

McGill researchers prove Darwin right about how evolution can affect a whole group The highly specialized worker castes in ants represent the pinnacle of social organization in the insect world. As in any society, however, ant colonies are filled with internal strife and conflict. So what binds them together? More than 150 years ago, Charles Darwin had an idea and now he's been proven right. Evolutionary biologists at McGill University have discovered molecular signals that can maintain...

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2008-11-18 10:52:11

Ants specializing on one job such as snatching food from a picnic are no more efficient than "Jane-of-all-trade" ants, according to new research. The finding casts doubt on the idea that the world-wide success of ants stems from job specialization within the colony. Ants are found on every continent besides Antarctica. "The question is, why is job specialization a good thing?" said Anna Dornhaus of The University of Arizona in Tucson. "We thought that the fact that ants have specialists was...

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2008-10-27 18:15:00

Ants prefer salty snacks to sugary ones, at least in inland areas that tend to be salt-poor, according to a new study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Ecologists from the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) and the University of Oklahoma tested the salt versus sugar preferences of ants from North, Central and South America, using ant populations at varying distances from the ocean. While ocean...

2008-07-27 00:00:24

By The Associated Press EDINBURG, Texas (AP) - South Texans eager to salvage what they can from waterlogged homes struck by Hurricane Dolly have another problem: The floodwaters they're slogging through are laced with stinging fire ants, snakes and tarantulas."You don't want to wade in this water," state Health Services Commissioner David Lakey said during a visit to the Rio Grande Valley on Friday. "You don't want to play in this water. You want to stay out of this water."It was timely...


Latest Vespoidea Reference Libraries

0_1b176b063c37655d81f4ab248352d3de
2005-09-12 11:56:41

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. The less familiar suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillarlike", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or parasitic. Most familiar wasps belong to the Aculeata, a division of the Apocrita whose ovipositors are...

40_6890040c3881a91ffa9ae5832977676d
2005-09-12 10:21:44

Spider wasps, also called pompilid wasps or spider-hunting wasps, are insects belonging to a diverse family named Pompilidae, of the order Hymenoptera. Spider wasps are sometimes distinct from other wasps in features such as eye structure (no notch as in Family Vespidae), legs modified for grooming, and in having a groove dividing the mesopleuron (a region of the thorax) into halves. Larvae can also be identified by physical examination. Females are often larger than the males, with...

40_2a82afe2a926ff17f8a6767143261c5b
2005-09-08 12:09:25

Yellowjackets are typically black-and-yellow wasps of the genus Vespula or Dolichovespula (though some can be black-and-white, the most notable of these being the bald-faced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata). They are characterized mostly by their distinctive combination of black-and-yellow color, small size (slightly larger than a bee), and entirely black antennae. They live in colonies and build globular paper nests. Workers are around 12-20 mm in length, depending on species, and feed on...

40_f0d9886e30d819cc3f9700977b463e08
2005-08-25 09:20:52

Paper Wasps are social wasps and make up the genus Polistes. They form small colonies with umbrella-shaped nests in sheltered spots, and are quite mild-mannered. They feed on caterpillars and other soft-bodied insects, most of them pests. Despite the use of the proper name, most social wasps make nests from paper, although some tropical wasp species such as Listenogaster Flavolineata use mud, a far more easy resource for the wasp to collect. The larger colonial species, Yellowjackets,...

40_e84b7351a70d1d2195a6554703b4a633
2005-08-25 08:44:29

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. Less familiar, the suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillar-like", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or parasitic. Most familiar wasps belong to the Aculeata, a division of the Apocrita whose ovipositors...

More Articles (11 articles) »
Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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