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Vespoidea Reference Libraries

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Wasp
2005-09-12 11:56:41

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. The less familiar suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillarlike", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or...

Spider wasp
2005-09-12 10:21:44

Spider wasps, also called pompilid wasps or spider-hunting wasps, are insects belonging to a diverse family named Pompilidae, of the order Hymenoptera. Spider wasps are sometimes distinct from other wasps in features such as eye structure (no notch as in Family Vespidae), legs modified for grooming, and in having a groove dividing the mesopleuron (a region of the thorax) into halves. Larvae...

Yellowjacket
2005-09-08 12:09:25

Yellowjackets are typically black-and-yellow wasps of the genus Vespula or Dolichovespula (though some can be black-and-white, the most notable of these being the bald-faced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata). They are characterized mostly by their distinctive combination of black-and-yellow color, small size (slightly larger than a bee), and entirely black antennae. They live in colonies and...

Paper wasp
2005-08-25 09:20:52

Paper Wasps are social wasps and make up the genus Polistes. They form small colonies with umbrella-shaped nests in sheltered spots, and are quite mild-mannered. They feed on caterpillars and other soft-bodied insects, most of them pests. Despite the use of the proper name, most social wasps make nests from paper, although some tropical wasp species such as Listenogaster Flavolineata use...

Wasp
2005-08-25 08:44:29

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. Less familiar, the suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillar-like", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or...

Yellowjacket
2005-07-14 11:42:55

Yellowjackets are black-and-yellow wasps of the genus Vespula or Dolichovespula (though some can be black-and-white, the most notable of these being the baldfaced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata). They can be identified by their distinctive combination of black-and-yellow color, small size (slightly larger than a bee), and entirely black antennae. Like some other vespids, they live in...

Sapygidae
2005-07-14 11:40:31

The Sapygidae are a family of solitary aluleate wasps. There does not seem to be a common English name, but Club-horned wasps (translating the German name Keulhornwespen - in reference to the distinctive thickening of the antennae) seems as good a name as any. The female oviposits her eggs into the nests of solitary bees, and the developing larvae consume both the host larvae and the supply...

Scoliidae
2005-07-14 11:26:54

Scoliidae (Scoliid wasps) are represented by 20 genera and about the same number of species in North America. Scoliid wasp larvae act as important biocontrol agents, feeding upon beetle larvae in the ground, including the serious pest, Japanese beetles. Adult wasps are pollinators of many wildflowers.

Cicada killer wasp
2005-07-14 00:37:32

The Cicada Killer Wasp is a large, solitary wasp so named because is hunts cicadas and provisions its nest with them. In North America it is sometimes called the Sand Hornet, although it is not a hornet, which belong to the family Vespidae. Taxonomy The North American cicada killer wasps all belong to the genus Sphecius, of which there are 21 species worldwide. The four cicada-killing...

Velvet ant
2005-07-13 10:20:09

Mutillidae or velvet ants, also known as cow killers, are not ants but a type of wasp. They get their name from the hair that grows on their back. The hair ranges from red and black to completely white. Their shell is very tough, providing protection against wasp and bee stings. The males have wings, but the females are completely wingless. It is wrongly said that their venom is powerful...

Word of the Day
dingle
  • A small wooded valley; a dell.
  • The protecting weather-shed built around the entrance to a house.
  • The roofed-over space between the kitchen and the sleeping-quarters in a logging-camp, commonly used as a storeroom.
The word 'dingle' comes from Middle English dell, hollow.
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