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Latest Virginia Institute of Marine Science Stories

2014-03-27 11:09:39

Test shows it could have accurately forecasted flooding in NYC during Sandy The water that surged into the intersection of New York City’s Canal and Hudson streets during Hurricane Sandy—to choose just one flood-ravaged locale—was ultimately driven ashore by forces swirling hundreds of miles out in the Atlantic. That simple fact shows not only the scale and power of a tropical cyclone, but the difficulty of modeling and forecasting its potential for coastal flooding on the fine...

2013-12-04 19:18:10

Virginia Institute of Marine Science Left to themselves, coastal wetlands can resist rapid levels of sea-level rise. But humans could be sabotaging some of their best defenses, according to a Nature review paper published Thursday from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. The threat of disappearing coastlines has alerted many to the dangers of climate change. Wetlands in particular—with their ability to buffer coastal cities from...

Fish Species That Thrive In Bay Bottoms Are Being Impacted By Dead Zones
2013-07-09 07:35:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) have completed a 10-year study, providing the first quantitative evidence on a bay-wide scale that the distribution and abundance of "demersal" fishes -- fish species that live and feed near the Bay bottom -- are being impacted by low-oxygen "dead zones." Species affected by these dead zones, such as the Atlantic croaker, white perch, spot, striped bass and summer...

2013-05-10 11:42:03

Oyster reefs shown to buffer acidic inputs to Chesapeake Bay Scientists have identified many benefits for restoring oyster reefs to Chesapeake Bay and other coastal ecosystems. Oysters filter and clean the water, provide habitat for their own young and for other species, and sustain both watermen and seafood lovers. A new study co-authored by Professor Roger Mann of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science adds another item to this list of benefits–the ability of oyster reefs to...

Key Role In Marine Ecosystem Health Played By Tiny Grazers
2013-04-03 10:55:32

USGS Tiny sea creatures no bigger than a thumbtack are being credited for playing a key role in helping provide healthy habitats for many kinds of seafood, according to a new study by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and U.S. Geological Survey. The little crustacean “grazers,” some resembling tiny shrimp, are critical in protecting seagrasses from overgrowth by algae, helping keep these aquatic havens healthy for native and economically important species. ...

2012-03-22 13:35:51

Professor Robert Diaz of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science is a co-editor of “Valuing the Ocean” a major new study by an international team of scientists and economists that attempts to measure the ocean´s monetary value and to tally the costs and savings associated with human decisions affecting ocean health. The study estimates that if human impacts on the ocean continue unabated, declines in ocean health and services will cost the global economy $428 billion per...

2011-12-06 23:00:18

New discoveries in “marine forensics” by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science will allow federal seafood agents to genetically test blue marlin to quickly and accurately determine their ocean of origin. The test is needed to ensure that the blue marlin sold in U.S. seafood markets were not taken from the Atlantic Ocean. The import and sale of blue marlin from the Pacific or Indian oceans is legal in the U.S., while the marketing of Atlantic blues can bring...

2011-08-15 22:25:02

Seven species are threatened and in need of further protection A global study by an international team including professor John Graves of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science has found that several species of tunas and billfishes are threatened and in need of further protection. The team's analysis"”published in a recent issue of Science magazine's Policy Forum"”is the first study of global tuna and billfish populations using the methods of the International Union for...

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2011-06-07 08:43:40

A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) shows that jellyfish are more than a nuisance to bathers and boaters, drastically altering marine food webs by shunting food energy from fish toward bacteria. An apparent increase in the size and frequency of jellyfish blooms in coastal and estuarine waters around the world during the last few decades means that jellies' impact on marine food webs is likely to increase into the future. The results of the study, led...

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2011-05-26 10:32:07

A team of 21 researchers from 11 nations, including professor Robert "JJ" Orth of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, has completed the first-ever study of the risk of extinction for individual seagrass species around the world. The 4-year study, requested by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), shows that 10 of the 72 known seagrass species (14%) are at an elevated risk of extinction, while 3 species qualify as endangered. The authors caution that loss of...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.