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Latest Virulence Stories

Nasty 'Superbug' Being Studied By Researchers
2012-02-18 06:00:55

It's virulent, potentially drug-resistant, strikes otherwise healthy, young patients, and Buffalo has already seen one case University at Buffalo researchers are expressing concern about a new, under-recognized, much more potent variant of a common bacterium that has surfaced in the U.S. "Historically, in Western countries, classical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae have caused infections mostly in sick, hospitalized patients whose host defense systems are compromised," says Thomas...

2012-02-06 22:37:07

Susceptibility to anthrax toxin is a heritable genetic trait that may vary tremendously among individuals, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Among 234 people studied, the cells of three people were virtually insensitive to the toxin, while the cells of some people were hundreds of times more sensitive than those of others. The findings may have important implications for national security, as people known to be more resistant to anthrax...

2012-02-01 20:49:13

Studying self-replicating genetic units, called plasmids, found in one of the world's widest-ranging pathogenic soil bacteria -- the crown-gall-disease-causing microorganism Agrobacterium tumefaciens -- Indiana University biologists are showing how freeloading, mutant derivatives of these plasmids benefit while the virulent, disease-causing plasmids do the heavy-lifting of initiating infection in plant hosts. The research confirms that the ability of bacteria to cause disease comes at a...

2012-01-31 06:09:55

Among medical mysteries baffling many infectious disease experts is exactly how the deadly pneumonic plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, goes undetected in the first few day of lung infection, often until it's too late for medical treatment. New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has opened a door to the answer. Researchers led by William E. Goldman, PhD, professor and chair of microbiology and immunology at the University of North Carolina at...

2012-01-30 14:13:40

Escherichia coli bacteria thrive in the lower intestine of humans and other animals, including birds. Most are vital constituents of the healthy gut flora, but certain forms of E. coli cause a range of diseases in both humans and poultry. In this month´s issue of the journal PLoS ONE, a team of researchers at Arizona State University´s Biodesign Institute investigates disease-causing E. coli strains known as APEC (for Avian Pathogenic E. coli).  By studying circular segments...

2012-01-09 19:54:23

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have developed a new way to identify the genes of harmful microbes, particularly those that have been difficult to study in the laboratory. This new method uses chemicals to create mutant bacteria, followed by genomic sequencing to identify all mutations. By looking for common genes that were mutated in Chlamydia sharing a particular trait, the investigators were able to rapidly "zero in" on the genes responsible for that trait. The approach...

2011-12-13 14:47:07

Single-celled bacteria communicate with each other using coded messages to coordinate attacks on their targets. Until now, the diversity of codes employed by these invading bacteria was thought to be extremely limited. However, a new report published Dec. 12 in PLoS ONE reveals bacterial communication by a novel, previously undescribed signal type — and, as is often the case in evolutionary stories, some plants have evolved a complementary cypher-breaking detection system that...

2011-12-10 01:49:36

• The study focuses on the protein Ler, which is present in the pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli that caused an outbreak of food poisoning in Germany last May. • Ler binds multiple DNA sequences, thereby activating numerous genes responsible for bacterial virulence. • The findings of the study have been published in PloS Pathogens. A team headed by scientists from the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) reports how the protein Ler, which is...

2011-12-09 11:51:09

A protein called enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays a central role in plants' ability to defend themselves from pathogens. But in the almost two decades since it was discovered, how EDS1 works at the molecular level has been a mystery. Solving the mystery will help scientists enhance disease resistance in crops. Two papers published in the Dec. 9 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine) demonstrate how EDS1 activates different components of the plant immune system,...

2011-11-18 03:55:38

Results in 'Science' could identify new ways to design vaccines, antibiotics A University of Louisville scientist has determined for the first time how the bacterium that causes Legionnaires´ disease manipulates our cells to generate the amino acids it needs to grow and cause infection and inflammation in the lungs. The results are published online today (Nov. 17) in Science. Yousef Abu Kwaik, Ph.D., the Bumgardner Endowed Professor in Molecular Pathogenesis of Microbial Infections...


Latest Virulence Reference Libraries

69_6c18294b6ad5d3bd2a21fde1a9e1ea03
2011-04-14 13:29:59

Acinetobacter baumannii is a species of pathogenic bacteria that is resistant to most antibiotics. Some think the disease is killing tens of thousands of U.S. hospital patients each year due to its resistance to drug treatment. It can cause severe pneumonia and infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream, and other parts of the body. It forms opportunistic infections including reports of attacking wounded soldiers and is sometimes abbreviated as MDRAB. It is the most relevant human...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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