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Latest Visceral gout Stories

2011-11-18 06:58:19

Veterinary drug residue in cattle and livestock carcasses is killing South Asian vultures Vultures in South Asia were on the brink of extinction until Lindsay Oaks and Richard Watson, from The Peregrine Fund in the US, undertook observational and forensic studies to find out why the number of birds was falling so rapidly. They discovered the vultures were being poisoned by residues of an anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac) used in cattle and other livestock, whose carcasses they feed on....

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2011-05-12 12:14:18

The banning of a painkiller that causes visceral gout, a fatal kidney ailment in vultures, has shown first signs of progress in the populations of South Asian vultures, according to scientists. But the study warns that the death rate from the drug is still too high, and that the complete removal of the painkiller, diclofenac, is needed to see further recovery of the wild vulture populations. Veterinary use of diclofenac in the treatment of cattle and buffaloes was banned in 2006 by India,...

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2010-09-05 11:50:00

Wildlife Conservation Society-led census boasts record numbers for vulturesWhile vultures across Asia teeter on the brink of extinction, the vultures of Cambodia are increasing in number, providing a beacon of hope for these threatened scavengers, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and other members of the Cambodia Vulture Conservation Project.Researchers report that record numbers of vultures have been counted in Cambodia's annual vulture census, with 296 birds of three...

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2009-12-10 07:38:06

A second veterinary pain drug used to treat cattle could be deadly to endangered vultures that feed on the carcasses of livestock, according to a study released Wednesday. The death toll of the slender-billed and oriental white-backed vultures has reached the millions in South Asia, mostly in India, after consuming the carcasses of sick cattle that had been treated with anti-inflammatory painkiller diclofenac, reported the Associated Press. Researchers writing in the Royal Society journal...

2006-05-24 00:40:59

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India has banned the production and sale of an anti-inflammatory drug used in cattle that is poisoning the country's vultures one step up the food chain. Vultures fulfil a vital role, stripping down animal carcasses that would otherwise slowly rot and attract disease-spreading feral dogs and vermin. But the number of South Asia's Oriental white-backed, long-billed and slender-billed vultures has plummeted more than 97 percent over 15 years, which scientists say...

2006-01-31 00:50:00

LONDON -- Scientists have offered a ray of hope to Asian vultures being wiped out in India after eating the corpses of cattle treated with a common anti-inflammatory drug. And they called on the Indian government, which has already banned the use of the drug diclofenac, to intensify a captive breeding program for threatened Oriental white-backed, long-billed and slender-billed vultures. Writing on Tuesday in the journal PLoS Biology, the scientists from Britain, India, South Africa and...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.