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Latest Visual cortex Stories

sight and sound in the visual cortex
2014-05-26 04:33:05

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While analyzing the brain processes associated with sight, researchers from the University of Glasgow have discovered that the visual cortex processes information not just from the eyes, but from the ears as well. Writing in the journal Current Biology, the study authors explain that the auditory input makes it possible for a person’s visual system to predict incoming information, thus giving them an advantage in potentially...

Researchers Find ‘Seeing Jesus In Toast’ Phenomenon Perfectly Normal
2014-05-07 03:35:20

University of Toronto People who claim to see “Jesus in toast” may no longer be mocked in the future thanks to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto and partner institutions in China. Researchers have found that the phenomenon of “face pareidolia”– where onlookers report seeing images of Jesus, Virgin Mary, or Elvis in objects such as toasts, shrouds, and clouds — is normal and based on physical causes. “Most people think you have to be mentally...

Area Of The Brain That Creates Illusory Shapes And Surfaces Discovered By Scientists
2013-10-01 11:10:48

Vanderbilt University The logo of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics includes red, white and blue stars, but the white star is not really there: It is an illusion. Similarly, the "S" in the USA Network logo is wholly illusory. Both of these logos take advantage of a common perceptual illusion where the brain, when viewing a fragmented background, frequently sees shapes and surfaces that don't really exist. "It's hallucinating without taking drugs," said Alexander Maier, assistant...

Scientists Look At How The Brain Compensates For Speed
2013-05-08 18:47:22

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of California in Berkeley have finally pinpointed the area of the brain responsible for not only seeing fast-moving objects, but responding to them as well. This development explains why athletes are able to react and respond to balls traveling at speeds upwards of 100 miles an hour. According to this research, our brains are capable of “pushing” fast moving objects, so we perceive...

2013-04-22 22:30:54

UC Berkeley study shows how we refocus to track down a human, animal or thing A contact lens on the bathroom floor, an escaped hamster in the backyard, a car key in a bed of gravel: How are we able to focus so sharply to find that proverbial needle in a haystack? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that when we embark on a targeted search, various visual and non-visual regions of the brain mobilize to track down a person, animal or thing. That means...

Scientists Probe Source Of A Pulsing Signal In The Sleeping Brain
2013-04-18 13:35:40

Technische Universitaet Muenchen New findings clarify where and how the brain's "slow waves" originate. These rhythmic signal pulses, which sweep through the brain during deep sleep at the rate of about one cycle per second, are assumed to play a role in processes such as consolidation of memory. For the first time, researchers have shown conclusively that slow waves start in the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for cognitive functions. They also found that such a wave...

Brain's Visual Cortex Activates For Reward Even When Stimulus Is Removed
2013-03-22 12:15:13

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international collaborative study, conducted by researchers at both KU Leuven and the Harvard Medical School, has attempted to recreate Ivan Pavlov´s famous experiment, but with a twist. Pavlov, you may know, was famous for conducting a study where a stimulus was introduced and the reward for that stimulus was slowly removed, with the aim of observing whether or not a physiological response would continue to be registered...

How The Brain Categorizes Thousands Of Objects And Actions Revealed By New Study
2012-12-19 16:52:49

Cell Press [ Watch The Video ] Humans perceive numerous categories of objects and actions, but where are these categories represented spatially in the brain? Researchers reporting in the December 20 issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron present their study that undertook the remarkable task of determining how the brain maps over a thousand object and action categories when subjects watched natural movie clips. The results demonstrate that the brain efficiently represents the diversity...

New Sound Device Teaches Blind People To See
2012-11-08 08:57:31

[WATCH VIDEO: Examples of Visual Stimuli Used in SSD Training] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has been long believed that blindness in early infanthood makes sight restoration later in life next to impossible as the brain´s visual cortex has been deprived of visual information. But some researchers have shown that blind people, even those with lifelong blindness, can learn to process visual input using sound. Working from the Hebrew University of...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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