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Latest Visual perception Stories

2011-03-17 12:18:41

It is no surprise to scientists that the largest social network on the web is called Facebook. Identifying people by their face is fundamental to our social interactions, one of the primary reasons vision researchers are trying to find out how our brain processes facial identity. In a study recently published in the Journal of Vision, scientists used an original approach "” a method that "shakes" the brain gently and repeatedly by making an image appear and disappear at a constant rate...

2011-03-09 14:48:17

Max Planck scientists show how flexibly the brain processes images Our brains process many more stimuli than we become aware of. Often images enter our brain without being noticed: visual information is being processed, but does not reach consciousness, that is, we do not have an impression of it. Then, what is the difference between conscious and unconscious perception, and can both forms of perception be changed through practice? These questions are important not only for basic research,...

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2011-03-08 11:58:32

As sight starts to degrade once we reach our mid-teens, it is vital that we maintain habits to keep good eyesight throughout our lives, vision experts say. Maintaining healthy vision is the main theme for the "Young Visionaries" from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Vision Science, the "ËœVision Centre'. As part of Children's Vision Day on March 10, the group of early-career researchers will be joining the national effort to promote good eyesight among Australian school children....

2011-02-18 10:42:00

LA JOLLA, Calif., Feb. 18, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Salk Institute for Biological Studies today announced a generous gift from Mr. Conrad Prebys, a Salk Trustee, to establish the Conrad T. Prebys Endowed Chair in Vision Research for Dr. Tom Albright. As part of their senior scientist endowed chair challenge, Joan and Irwin Jacobs will match the donor's gift with an additional $1,000,000 to establish the donor's named chair at $3,000,000. "This unique gift will help change the...

2011-02-11 13:19:19

Most of us are familiar with the idea of image compression in computers. File extensions like ".jpg" or ".png" signify that millions of pixel values have been compressed into a more efficient format, reducing file size by a factor of 10 or more with little or no apparent change in image quality. The full set of original pixel values would occupy too much space in computer memory and take too long to transmit across networks. The brain is faced with a similar problem. The images captured by...

2011-02-01 00:36:51

For one in four children, the reason why they hate school goes beyond homework and tough math. Surprising vision problems that are often undetected by parents, educators and doctors can cause students to dislike and struggle in school. Brookfield, WI (PRWEB) January 31, 2011 For one in four children, the reason they hate school goes far beyond too much homework and not enough recess. Their dislike for school results in non-stop complaining at home, bad behavior in the classroom, and poor...

2011-01-10 13:57:26

A team of researchers has demonstrated that the brain predicts consequences of our eye movements on what we see next. The findings, which appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience, have implications for understanding human attention and applications to robotics. The study was conducted by researchers at University Paris Descartes, New York University's Department of Psychology, and Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich. Our eyes jump rapidly about three times each second to capture new...

2010-12-06 14:12:49

How the brain's architecture makes our view of the world unique Wellcome Trust scientists have shown for the first time that exactly how we see our environment depends on the size of the visual part of our brain. We are all familiar with the idea that our thoughts and emotions differ from one person to another, but most people assume that how we perceive the visual world is usually very similar from person to person. However, the primary visual cortex "“ the area at the back of the...

2010-10-27 13:51:03

Study suggests brain may adapt to vision loss by increasing speed of tactile perception People who are blind from birth are able to detect tactile information faster than people with normal vision, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The brain requires a fraction of a second to register a sight, sound, or touch. In this study, a group of researchers led by Daniel Goldreich, PhD, of McMaster University explored whether people who have a special reliance on...

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2010-10-13 22:02:26

Those who do a lot of driving know how tiring long car trips and night driving can be. And a simple fraction of a second can decide the difference between life and death. According to the German Road Safety Council e.V. (DVR), one in four highway traffic fatalities is the result of momentary driver drowsiness. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Ilmenau, Germany, have developed an assistant system that tracks a driver's eye movements and issues a...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.