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Latest vitamin K Stories

2008-09-02 03:00:09

By Asp, Karen Sticks and stones may break your bones, but so will a lack of information. Here, six surprising truths about osteoporosis. BY KAREN ASP WENDY MIKOLA HAS A LIFESTYLE ANY PHYSICIAN WOULD PRAISE. The 36-year-old accountant from Ohio exercises regularly, doesn't smoke, and fills her plate with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and whole grains. But there's one glaring lapse: She doesn't give much thought to protecting her bones. "I figure that's something I can worry...

2008-08-29 12:00:33

By On Nutrition/Helayne Waldman IN THE PAST 20 years, Americans have been gulping down milk and calcium pills like never before, yet the rate of osteoporosis, a disabling bone disease, has been rising. While more than 10 million women in the United States have a confirmed diagnosis, an additional 34 million have a "pre-osteoporosis" condition known as osteopenia. What's going on here? Here are a few thoughts, and a few suggestions. Boning up Bone tissue is composed, in large part, of...

2008-08-27 03:00:24

By Anonymous Vitamin D deficiency in children increases their risk of serious health problems later in life, including decreased bone density and type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes, which is why all pregnant and breastfeeding women should take a prenatal vitamin containing vitamin D. This is the recommendation of Dr. Tohru Yorifuji of Kyoto University Hospital. His research on 1,120 newborns found that 22% had, at age five to seven days, craniotabes (softening of the skull bones). He...

2008-08-24 18:00:26

Dr. Hugh Butt, whose studies of coagulation showed Vitamin K could help stop internal bleeding, has died in Rochester, Minn. He was 98. Butt's Aug. 16 death was confirmed by a spokeswoman for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, where Butt was chief of the division of gastroenterology and internal medicine from 1967 to 1974, The New York Times reported Sunday. Butt's research also found that Vitamin K could help patients with jaundice, the newspaper reported. After his discoveries, Butt was...

2008-08-18 12:00:14

Having too little vitamin D in the body might raise the risk of premature death, a study by Johns Hopkins researchers shows. It follows other recent studies showing that low amounts of vitamin D are linked to certain cancers, diabetes, and bone and immune system problems, but this is the first research to connect vitamin D deficiency to a higher risk of death, said the study's co- author Erin Michos, an assistant professor of cardiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore....

2008-08-12 06:00:17

By Mary Brophy Marcus Low levels of vitamin D may raise a person's risk of premature death, a study by Johns Hopkins researchers shows. The research follows other recent studies showing low levels of vitamin D are linked to certain cancers, diabetes, and bone and immune system problems, but this is the first research to connect vitamin D deficiency to a higher risk of death, says study author Erin Michos, assistant professor of cardiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in...

2008-07-30 21:00:19

By Lydia Gehring A special request came to me last week. A friend asked for a list of Vitamin K foods. Without giving me any other information she said that it was important to know more about Vitamin K. Usually Vitamin K is limited in the diet while taking the drug Warfarin, also known as Coumadin. This drug acts as an anti- coagulant. This means that when a person's blood is too thick and forms clots, the risk for heart attack, stroke and other serious medical problems increases....

2008-07-29 03:00:00

By Napoli, Maryann The importance of vitamin D was featured recently in two medical journals. Archives of Internal Medicine published a study that found low blood levels of vitamin D to be independently associated with a higher death rate, especially from cardiovascular disease. And a case report in the British Medical Journal vividly illustrates why vitamin D is called the "sunshine vitamin." It recounts the severe health problems experienced by a woman of Pakistani origin whose doctors...

2008-07-14 18:00:12

Recommendations vary on how much vitamin D is enough but 800 to 1,000 international units is likely to benefit most adults, a U.S. newsletter says. The July issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource reports the body produces vitamin D when exposed to the sun's ultraviolet rays but many people need a supplement to reach recommended levels. Many multivitamins contain vitamin D but the nutrient, also found in milk, can be purchased alone or combined with calcium. Vitamin D deficiency is...

2008-07-14 06:00:12

By Mary Brophy Marcus Testing for vitamin D levels, once uncommon, has skyrocketed as medical studies raise awareness about vitamin D deficiencies, according to three of the USA's largest medical diagnostic labs. Physicians agree that they're increasingly using the blood test to find out whether their patients are low on the vital vitamin. Richard Reitz, a medical director with Quest Diagnostics of Madison, N.J., says tests ordered for vitamin D grew by about 80% from May 2007 to May...


Latest vitamin K Reference Libraries

Leaf vegetables
2013-08-21 09:03:22

Leaf vegetables are leaves from various plants that are edible with some leaves having tender shoots, such as beet greens, attached. Leaf vegetables are very high in nutrition and may be used in various culinary dishes. While there are over a thousand species of leaf vegetables, they generally come from plants that are short-lived such as lettuce and spinach. Leaf vegetables are high in vitamin K which is caused from the photosynthesis that takes place during the growing phase. Anyone on...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.