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Latest Vitellogenin Stories

Bees Have A Sweet Tooth Too
2012-07-01 10:00:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online According to scientists at Arizona State University, honey bees may hold clues to human taste perception and metabolic disorders. Gro Amdam, an associate professor, and Ying Wang, a research scientist, in the School of Life Sciences in ASU´s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences conducted genetic tests on honey bees and identified connections between sugar sensitivity, diabetic physiology and carbohydrate metabolism. Bees and...

2011-11-29 11:46:23

Why are bee colonies worldwide suffering mysterious deaths? A unique study describes a single bee protein that can promote bee health and solve a major economic challenge. Honey bees are the most effective pollinators of many agricultural crops and vitally important to food production. Honey bee health is a topic of considerable concern due to massive deaths of bee colonies in the USA and Europe. Recently, the European Union reacted by promising more resources for honey bee research,...

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2010-06-22 06:14:02

According to US researchers on Monday, a Colorado wastewater treatment plant has received upgrades to help filter out gender-bending chemicals that were affecting fish. The researchers said male fish are now taking longer to be feminized by so-called hormone disrupters in one Colorado creek after improvements to a Boulder wastewater treatment facility was done in 2008. David Norris of the University of Colorado at Boulder had earlier found ethinylestradiol, a female hormone used in...

2010-04-02 09:00:48

A new study of food-choice behavior in honey bees, published April 1 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, has identified a gene involved in bees' decisions to bring protein or nectar back to the colony. By taking control of the Insulin Receptor Substrate gene (IRS), an insulin partner gene in the bees' fat cells, researchers at Arizona State University and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences made the insects forego carbohydrates (sugar-containing nectar) and favor protein...

2007-04-03 09:00:18

By Sumpter, John Phillip In the last few years, it has been demonstrated that many human pharmaceuticals are present in the aquatic environment, albeit at very low concentrations. Nevertheless, in at least one case, that of ethinyl estradiol, it is very likely that in some locations ethinyl estradiol is adversely affecting fish through its "feminization" of males. Another pharmaceutical, diclofenac, has caused the deaths of millions of vultures in Southeast Asia through its use in...

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2006-01-07 08:45:00

NASA -- One of the puzzling questions in the evolution of bees is how some species developed social behaviors. Arizona State University Life Sciences associate professor Gro Amdam thinks part of the answer can be traced back to bee reproductive traits. A paper describing Amdam's experiments, "Complex social behavior derived from maternal reproductive traits," is the cover story of the current issue (Jan. 5, 2006) of Nature. Additional authors include M. Kim Fondrk and Robert Page from...