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Latest Vivian Ho Stories

2011-02-16 16:34:21

Dr. Vivian Ho, professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and professor of health economics at Rice University, is a featured speaker at the annual health leadership luncheon and conference sponsored by the Texas Medical Center Women's Health Network Feb. 28. Ho, along with other local health care and human services leaders, will discuss various areas of health care in the program "Making Sense Out of Chaos" at the annual leadership event which takes place from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30...

2009-06-16 18:33:21

An estimated 8 million U.S. children are uninsured, but providing them health insurance would yield substantial economic benefits, researchers said. Providing health insurance to all children in America will yield substantial economic benefits, Vivian Ho of the Baylor College of Medicine and Rice University's Baker Institute said in a statement. Ho and Marah Short, also of the Baker Institute in Houston, based their research on recent studies published in peer-reviewed journals to examine...

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2009-06-16 11:40:00

Extending health insurance coverage to all children in the U.S. would be relatively inexpensive and would yield economic benefits that are greater than the costs, according to new research conducted at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy."Providing health insurance to all children in America will yield substantial economic benefits," wrote Vivian Ho, chair in health economics at the Baker Institute and associate professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. She...

2009-01-28 08:37:06

States that dropped regulations overseeing the performance of two common heart procedures showed no increase in death rates, according to researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Rice University and Duke University Medical Center. The findings are available online in the journal Health Services Research.  The regulations, known as "certificate of need" or CON, require hospitals to obtain approval from a designated state agency before adding new facilities or offering especially...

2009-01-23 12:41:04

States that dropped regulations overseeing the performance of two common heart procedures showed no increase in death rates, say researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University and Duke University Medical Center. The findings appear online in the current issue of Health Services Research Journal. The regulations, known as Certificate of Need (CON), require hospitals to obtain approval from a designated state agency before adding new facilities or offering especially costly...

2008-06-25 03:00:48

By Anonymous Physicians who refer patients to their own facilities or machines for scans account for much of the increase in diagnostic imaging ordered for privately insured patients, said a Baylor College of Medicine expert in a commentary that appeared in the May issue of the journal Medical Care (2008:46:455-458). Referring to a study appearing in the same issue (460-466). Vivian Ho. PhD. professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and associate professor of economics at Rice...

2005-07-08 18:45:00

Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are more likely to have a foot or leg amputated if they live in a region that has few vascular surgeons, according to a Rice University/Baylor College of Medicine study published in the July issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery. "We found that areas of the country that had higher numbers of vascular surgeons had more bypass surgery performed and lower amputation rates," said principal investigator Vivian Ho, a health economist at Rice's...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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