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Latest Voles and lemmings Stories

2011-11-18 07:02:25

The mention of lemmings usually evokes images of small rodents throwing themselves off the top of cliffs in acts of mass suicide; however, their reputations might no longer be determined by hearsay as a new report suggests they could be having an intricate effect on the Earth's climate. The study, published today, 18 November, in IOP Publishing's journal Environmental Research Letters, suggests that lemmings may be maintaining the biomass of certain plants in the Arctic at a time when the...

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2011-08-25 10:38:22

  Why different species have dissimilar sets of chromosomes? Why the differentiated species often conserve apparently identical chromosome complements? Furthermore, why, while chromosome rearrangements can considerably change the course of species evolution, certain variation among individuals and populations of some species persists indefinitely? Such questions motivate researchers to compare chromosomes in closely related species. To understand the nature of chromosome changes in...

2010-10-14 15:02:01

Surprising TAU research finds common stress levels in social groups Anxiety, or the reaction to a perceived danger, is a response that differs from one animal or human to another "” or so scientists thought. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University  are challenging what we know about stress, and their study has implications for helping clinicians better treat victims of terrorism or natural disasters. Prof. David Eilam and his graduate student Rony Izhar of Tel Aviv University's...

2010-08-04 16:33:25

According to evolutionary theory, natural selection favours traits that enhance dispersal of populations to new habitats. The empirical evidence supporting this theory, however, is relatively scarce. A study carried out by researchers from the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences of the University of Helsinki, along with their Swedish colleagues, reports rapid evolution of traits facilitating dispersal in an outer archipelago. The results was published today in the Proceedings of...

2009-12-01 14:31:04

Model is expected to help researchers better understand social bonding and impairments to such behavior Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have successfully generated the first transgenic prairie voles, an important step toward unlocking the genetic secrets of pair bonding. The future application of this technology will enable scientists to perform a host of genetic manipulations that will help identify the brain mechanisms of social bonding and...

2009-11-30 15:59:06

Scientists from the Biological Station of Doñana (CSIC) and the have characterized the population genetic diversity of an animal species (a mouse, in this case) in its whole distribution. This information is essential for developing successful conservation plans for such species. This work was conducted by Alejandro Centeno Cuadros at the Doñana Biological Station (CSIC) in Sevilla, and the Department of Animal Biology of the University of Granada....

2009-09-03 11:51:47

U.S. primate researchers say they've used prairie voles as models in understanding early life parent-offspring nurturing impacts on later life relationships. Yerkes National Primate Research Center scientists at Emory University said by influencing early social experience in prairie voles, they have gained greater insight into what aspects of early social experience drive diversity in adult social behavior. Prairie voles are small, highly social, hamster-sized rodents that often form stable,...

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2009-01-28 13:40:00

An increase in snowy owl populations in the South suggests that the arctic species did so well in its northern breeding grounds last year that competition is driving the young ones to warmer climates, biologists told the Associated Press on Wednesday. Upstate New York and other northern states are considered the usual areas most snowy owls end up every winter. But researchers say this year several have been spotted farther south, in states where they're rarely seen. The first snowy owl...

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2008-11-06 12:00:00

Among the growing numbers of species to be hit by global climate change, it appears that lemming populations are declining due to wetter winters in southern Norway, researchers said. Scientists found that numbers of the animals no longer vary over a regular cycle, as they did until a decade ago. Writing in the journal Nature, researcher Nils Stenseth of Oslo University and colleagues from Norway and France found that a reduction of lemmings was causing predators such as the Arctic fox to eat...

2008-10-11 18:00:15

By Paul James WILDLIFE experts are calling for better protection for water voles after it emerged they have fled a Tyneside stream since an office development was built. They say population figures have gone from "strong" to almost nothing since the animals' Longbenton watercourse was diverted when Balliol Business Park was created in 2001. Developers at one stage halted building and spent pounds 150,000 on rerouting a road and installing two bridges over the stream after working with...


Latest Voles and lemmings Reference Libraries

Field Vole, Microtus agrestis
2012-08-05 21:06:26

The field vole (Microtus agrestis) is native to Europe, inhabiting a large range that includes Poland, France, Germany, and Belgium, among many other areas. It is not found in Ireland or in Iceland. It prefers a habitat within moist grasslands, like marshes and woodlands and along riverbanks. The population density of the field vole will fluctuate throughout a four-year period. The field vole will dig burrows underground, but it most commonly builds nests on the surface. It reaches an...

Common Vole, Microtus arvalis
2012-08-05 21:02:11

The common vole (Microtus arvalis) is native to Eurasia, with a very large range stretching across many areas. Its preferred habitat includes all areas besides densely forested areas. It will inhabit agricultural lands, and as a result will end up eating the crops found there, although it prefers grass. The common vole varies slightly in size between sexes, with males weighing an average of 1.7 ounces and females weighing 1.4 ounces if not pregnant. It will inhabit home ranges of up to .3...

Long-tailed Vole, Microtus longicaudus
2012-08-03 15:54:58

The long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus) is native to North America. Its range stretches from Alaska to California where it inhabits shrub lands and alpine meadows. It holds one subspecies, the Coronation Island vole, which was previously thought to be a distinct species. The long-tailed vole can reach an average body length of seven inches, with an average weight of 1.7 ounces. The fur is typically greyish brown in color, and pale grey on the underbelly. These voles are active...

Bank Vole, Myodes glareolus
2012-08-03 15:33:00

The bank vole (Myodes glareolus) can be found in northern Asia and Western Europe. Its range includes Great Britain, where it occurs natively, and Ireland, where it was unintentionally introduced. It is thought that within its Ireland range, it may be replacing the wood mouse, a native species. The bank vole prefers a habitat within woodland areas. The bank vole reaches an average body length of 3.9 inches. It is typically reddish brown in color with grey patches of fur appearing...

Southern Bog Lemming, Synaptomys cooperi
2012-07-27 12:32:47

The southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi) is native to North America, and its range overlaps with that of the Northern Bog Lemming in southeastern Canada. It prefers a habitat within wetlands, grasslands, and mixed forests in eastern North America. It once held two subspecies, the Kansas and Nebraska, bog lemmings, but these are now extinct. The southern bog lemming can reach an average body length of 5.1 inches and a weight of around 1.2 ounces. Its body is round with contrastingly...

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