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Latest Waggle dance Stories

2014-07-30 23:14:46

Transformative online learning platform incorporates seamless sign-on. New York, NY (PRWEB) July 30, 2014 Triumph Learning, producer of critically acclaimed K-12 texts and interactive digital tools, expands its partnership with Clever to include integration with district student information systems and seamless single sign-on with Instant Log-in without additional charges. The collaboration allows teachers and students to access Waggle with one click, and relieves teachers and...

honey bee hive
2014-05-25 05:39:39

Garrett Staas for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Honey bees are able to help promote growth within their environment by spreading pollen and feeding on nectar, and according to a new study, bees are able to dance in order to tell their brethren where the nearest and most pollen rich sources can be found. Researchers from Europe call it the "waggle dance," which the bees use to convey specific information, including distance and direction, of sources for foraging. By...

Invisible Light Patterns Help Bees Find Food Even On Cloudy Days
2014-01-08 05:06:45

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Bees are excellent navigators. Once they stumble upon a food source, they keep coming back to the same spot without faltering. They also have a great sense of smell and can recognize color patterns and symmetry in flowers – admirable feats for an insect whose brain is the size of a sesame seed. Scientists have long known that bees use the sunlight like a compass to map their route to the flowers full of succulent dew. They also...

Pesticide Turns Bees Into Picky Eaters
2012-05-24 04:47:49

[ Watch the Video ] Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com New research shows that a common pesticide can alter the appetite of honey bees and turn them into "picky eaters." Biologists at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) found that a single dose of imidacloprid given to bees made the insects crave sweeter foods and reject foods that may not be as tasty. According to the researchers, honey bees that prefer sweeter foods limit the amount of resources they contribute to the...

Bee Behavior Mimics Brain Neuron Function
2011-12-09 07:40:14

A new study of bees has come to the conclusion that bee swarm communication works similarly to that of neurons in the human brain. The study, published in the December 9 issue of Science, found that bees use inhibitory “stop” signals to prohibit the scout bees from completing a waggle dance that helps bees learn the directions of competing sites for new hives. This behavior helps to ensure that the best homesite is found for the hive. Thomas Seeley, a biologist from Cornell...

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2010-12-13 14:40:00

In the busy world of a honey bee hive, worker bees need their rest in order to best communicate the location of food to their hive mates, research from The University of Texas at Austin shows. "When deprived of sleep, humans typically experience a diminished ability to perform a variety of tasks, including communicating as clearly or as precisely," said Dr. Barrett Klein, a former ecology, evolution and behavior graduate student at the university. "We found that sleep-deprived honey bees also...

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2010-06-05 06:50:00

Ever wondered how cockroaches seem to know the best place to grab a meal? New research at Queen Mary, University of London suggests that, just like humans, they share their local knowledge of the best food sources and follow 'recommendations' from others. It is often striking how little we know about our closest neighbor. Until now, it was assumed that cockroaches forage on their own to find food and water. However, this work shows how groups of the insects seem to make a collective choice...

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2010-02-12 07:56:28

A biologist at UC San Diego has discovered that honey bees warn their nest mates about dangers they encounter while feeding with a special signal that's akin to a "stop" sign for bees. The discovery, detailed in a paper in the February 23 issue of the journal Current Biology, which appeared online Feb. 11, resulted from a series of experiments on honey bees foraging for food that were attacked by competitors from nearby colonies fighting for food at an experimental feeder. The bees that were...

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2009-07-31 12:53:25

Scientists have discovered that honeybees warn each other of dangerous flowers that might be harboring predators in wait. This warning system was found by planting dead bees on flowers and observing how other bees respond to the sign of danger. The bees did not just avoid the flowers; they also went on to communicate the threat to the hive through their famous waggle dance. The discovery is published in the journal Animal Behavior. Honeybees provide the most fascinating example of insect...


Latest Waggle dance Reference Libraries

Honeybee
2005-09-08 09:11:58

The honeybee is a colonial insect that is often maintained, fed, and transported by farmers. Honeybees are a subset of bees which fall into the Order Hymenoptera and Suborder Apocrita. Of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four are considered honeybees: Apis florea, Apis dorsata, Apis cerana, and Apis mellifera (Western honeybee). It is thought that they have been domesticated at least since the time of the building of the Egyptian pyramids. Honeybees store honey (which is...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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