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Latest Warm-blooded Stories

Dinosaurs Took A Middle Road Between Warm- And Cold-Blooded
2014-06-13 09:10:26

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There has been a long-standing debate over dinosaurs: were they cold-blooded like modern day reptiles or warm-blooded like mammals? In the early days of science, and in Hollywood, these prehistoric beasts were depicted as slow, lumbering giants as they were believed to be cold-blooded. But over the past few decades, these animals have been portrayed as swift-moving lizards, more reminiscent of warm-blooded behaviors. New...

Were Dinosaurs Warm Blooded?
2013-07-19 10:55:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Modern reptiles are cold-blooded, and many researchers maintain dinosaurs were as well. New research from the University of Adelaide, however, suggests dinosaurs may have been warm-blooded like birds and mammals. Professor Roger Seymour of UA's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences argues cold-blooded dinosaurs would have been unable to develop the necessary muscle power to prey on other animals and dominate...

Dinosaurs May Not Have Been Cold-Blooded After All
2012-06-28 10:13:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, suggests that dinosaurs were warm-blooded creatures, not cold-blooded reptiles as previously thought. According to BBC News Science and Technology Reporter Jason Palmer, researchers have disproven one of the primary bits of evidence supporting the four-decade-old theory that dinosaurs were cold blooded. That evidence, skeletal markings on the creatures' bones known as...

Athletic Frogs Have Faster-Changing Genomes
2012-04-13 07:59:11

Durham, NC – Physically fit frogs have faster-changing genomes, says a new study of poison frogs from Central and South America. Stretches of DNA accumulate changes over time, but the rate at which those changes build up varies considerably between species, said author Juan C. Santos of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in Durham, North Carolina. In the past, biologists trying to explain why some species have faster-changing genomes than others have focused on features...

How Do Mosquitoes Keep Their Cool?
2011-12-16 04:36:34

No one likes being bitten by whining mosquitoes, but have you ever considered what the experience is like for them as their cold-blooded bodies fill with our warm blood? Now researchers reporting online on December 15 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have uncovered the mosquitoes' secret to avoiding heat stress: they give up cooling droplets of their hard-won meals. The study shows for the first time that blood-feeding insects are capable of controlling their body temperature,...

2011-12-13 15:00:20

Ability of Brown Fat to Burn Calories Linked to Immune Cells, Say UCSF Researchers Throughout the interior spaces of humans and other warm-blooded creatures is a special type of tissue known as brown fat, which may hold the secret to diets and weight-loss programs of the future. Unlike ordinary “white” fat, in which the body stores excess calories, brown fat can burn calories to heat up the body. It´s one of the things that helps keep wild critters warm on cold nights....

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2011-06-24 11:40:00

Scientists have found a way to take the temperature of dinosaurs that have been extinct for millions of years. But since you cannot take their temperature like you do with humans, the researchers did the next best thing -- study dinosaur teeth, which can reflect body temperature. What they found is surprising. Studying the teeth of the long-necked Brachiosaurus, they discovered it had a temperature of about 100.8 degrees F and the smaller Camarasaurus had a temp of 98.3 degrees. Humans...

2011-06-22 22:21:28

New York Medical College scientist proposes a new theory of the origin of birds A developmental biologist at New York Medical College is proposing a new theory of the origin of birds, which traditionally has been thought to be driven by the evolution of flight. Instead, Stuart A. Newman, Ph.D., credits the emergence of enlarged skeletal muscles as the basis for their upright two-leggedness, which led to the opportunity for other adaptive changes like flying or swimming. And it is all based on...

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2010-05-24 15:03:55

Could help scientists track paleoclimate, determine whether dinosaurs and other species were warm- or cold-blooded Was Tyrannosaurus rex cold-blooded? Did birds regulate their body temperatures before or after they began to grow feathers? Why would evolution favor warm-bloodedness when it has such a high energy cost? Questions like these"”about when, why, and how vertebrates stopped relying on external factors to regulate their body temperatures and began heating themselves...

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2009-11-11 08:07:31

Were dinosaurs "warm-blooded" like present-day mammals and birds, or "cold-blooded" like present day lizards? The implications of this simple-sounding question go beyond deciding whether or not you'd snuggle up to a dinosaur on a cold winter's evening. In a study published this week in the journal PLoS ONE, a team of researchers, including Herman Pontzer, Ph.D., assistant professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences, has found strong evidence that many dinosaur species were probably...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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