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Latest Washington University in St. Louis Stories

2011-01-10 15:21:15

Scientists have invented a way to "Ëœwatch' proteins fold "” in less than thousandths of a second -- into the elaborate twisted shapes that determine their function. People have only 20,000 to 30,000 genes (the number is hotly contested), but they use those genes to make more than 2 million proteins. It's the protein molecules that domost of the work in the human cell. After all, the word protein comes from the Greek prota, meaning "of primary importance." Proteins are...

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2011-01-06 13:28:25

2 acceleration methods make scanning more than 7 times faster An international team of physicists and neuroscientists has reported a breakthrough in magnetic resonance imaging that allows brain scans more than seven times faster than currently possible. In a paper that appeared Dec. 20 in the journal PLoS ONE, a University of California, Berkeley, physicist and colleagues from the University of Minnesota and Oxford University in the United Kingdom describe two improvements that allow full...

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2010-12-22 10:09:04

By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis Experiments show that drilling mud that behaved more like quicksand and less like ketchup might have prevented the top-kill blowout On May 25th, 2010, the online arm of Upstream, a newspaper for the international oil and gas industry, reported that British Petroleum had started top-kill procedures on the Macondo well in the Gulf of Mexico. "The company said that the operation, which will pump heavy mud down the wellbore in an attempt to gain...

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2010-12-13 07:35:00

Scientists have an ingenious explanation for the strange ridge belting Saturn's outermost moon, Iapetus For centuries, people wondered how the leopard got its spots. The consensus is pretty solid that evolution played a major role. But it's only been five years since the arrival of high-resolution Cassini Mission images of Saturn's bizarre moon Iapetus that the international planetary community has pondered the unique walnut shape of the large (735 kilometer radius) body, considered by many...

2010-12-02 00:00:49

Survey recognizes commitment to quality and patient safety Washington, DC (Vocus) December 1, 2010 Children's National Medical Center is one of only seven children's hospitals in the country named to the Leapfrog Group's 2010 Top Hospitals List. The list is based on results from the Leapfrog Hospital annual survey, which focuses on objective measures and processes in crucial areas of patient safety and quality. "This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Leapfrog Group's work to recognize...

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2010-11-30 11:10:00

By Diana Lutz , Washington University in St. Louis It sounds a bit like spinning straw into gold, but novel metal catalysts may be able to turn greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide into liquid fuels without producing more carbon waste in the process. If fossil fuels burn completely, the end products are carbon dioxide and water. Today the carbon dioxide is a waste product, one that goes into the air "” adding to global warming; or the oceans "” acidifying them; or...

2010-11-20 00:00:51

Executive Vice President and Chief Development Officer Pam King Sams receives award at 9th annual National Capital Philanthropy Day. Washington, D.C. (Vocus) November 19, 2010 Children's National Medical Center Executive Vice President and Chief Development Officer Pam King Sams, CFRE, was named Thursday as the 2010 Outstanding Fundraising Professional by the Association of Fundraising Professionals during the 9th annual National Capital Philanthropy Day. "We are pleased to recognize Pam...

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2010-11-05 10:16:42

By Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a gene linked to the spread of eye melanoma. Although more research is needed, the researchers say the discovery is an important step in understanding why some tumors spread (metastasize) and others don't. They believe the findings could lead to more effective treatments. Reporting online in the journal Science Express, the team found mutations in a gene...

2010-10-31 00:13:30

Olin and the Brookings Institution Press publish a guide by professor Jackson Nickerson offering practical solutions and strategies for today's managers. Saint Louis, MO (PRWEB) October 30, 2010 Imagine telling your boss that the plan to re-organize your department is wrong-headed via a secured anonymous e-mail and he responds to your concern in a video message delivered to everyone in the company. Fiction? No, it's called "ChangeCasting" and a new approach to leading organizational change...

2010-10-26 14:04:58

An international team of researchers, including a physical anthropology professor at Washington University in St. Louis, has discovered well-dated human fossils in southern China that markedly change anthropologists perceptions of the emergence of modern humans in the eastern Old World. The research, based at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing, was published Oct. 25 in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.