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Latest Washington University in St. Louis Stories

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2009-02-11 14:40:38

Building on plant virus research started more than 20 years ago, a biologist at Washington University in St. Louis and his colleague at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis have discovered a technology that reduces infection by the virus that causes Rice Tungro Disease, a serious limiting factor for rice production in Asia. Roger N. Beachy, Ph.D., WUSTL professor of biology in Arts & Sciences and president of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and Danforth Center...

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2009-01-29 13:22:39

Brain processes stories as though they were real-life situations A new brain-imaging study is shedding light on what it means to "get lost" in a good book "” suggesting that readers create vivid mental simulations of the sounds, sights, tastes and movements described in a textual narrative while simultaneously activating brain regions used to process similar experiences in real life. "Psychologists and neuroscientists are increasingly coming to the conclusion that when we read a story...

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2009-01-14 06:26:40

Information obtained from a new application of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is worth its weight in gold to breast cancer patients. For the first time, Lihong Wang, Ph.D., Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in Radiology, and Younan Xia, Ph.D., James M. McKelvey Professor in Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in chemistry in Arts & Sciences, both at Washington University in St. Louis, have used gold...

2009-01-07 09:05:00

It's a little like finding out that Superman is actually Clark Kent.A team of biologists at Washington University in St. Louis has discovered that two vital cellular components, nuclear RNA Polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and V), found only in plants, are actually specialized forms of RNA Polymerase II, an essential enzyme of all eukaryotic organisms, including humans."We've caught evolution in the act," said Craig Pikaard, Ph.D., WUSTL professor of biology in Arts & Sciences. "We've known...

2008-12-29 10:32:00

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is named the nation's best pediatric hospital by Parents magazine. "Children's Hospital employees work tirelessly everyday to ensure every family has the ideal patient experience and we are truly grateful to our dedicated and talented staff," said Steven M. Altschuler, M.D., president and chief executive officer of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "We recognize our responsibility to provide...

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2008-12-12 11:25:00

A person's weight was something to be shared, enjoyed Stepping onto a scale after a calorie-filled holiday season isn't an activity many 21st-century Americans relish. But in the late 19th century, scales were all the rage at festive gatherings "” the 1800s' answer to Guitar Hero. "A family would think it fun to weigh themselves before and after a big holiday dinner to see how much they had gained," said Deborah I. Levine, Ph.D., an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Modeling...

2008-12-09 12:00:00

Rare back-to-back cesarean and liver transplant surgeries rescue dying mom and preemie baby STANFORD, Calif., Dec. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- "We were thinking we'd be lucky to get one live person out of this situation, and we didn't know which it would be," said William Benitz, MD. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081209/SF50878) Benitz, the chief of neonatology at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, was describing an extraordinary and intense collaboration by doctors...

2008-12-08 13:05:00

For the third year, Genome Technology magazine profiles the best up-and-coming young investigators, selected by the field's elite scientists NEW YORK, Dec. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Genome Technology magazine has named the 30 rising young stars who comprise its third annual "Tomorrow's PIs" special edition. This issue offers readers a chance to see large-scale biological research through the eyes of some of the best and the brightest scientists who are poised to make significant contributions to...

2008-10-14 09:00:45

Salt Lake City, Oct. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- NACHRI Annual Meeting, Booth #108 -- GetWellNetwork, Inc., the innovator and leading provider of Interactive Patient Care (IPC) solutions, today announced that its pediatric client community has reached record growth during 2008. Designed to help hospitals educate, engage and empower pediatric patients and their families, the GetWellNetwork(R) PatientLife System(R) leverages interactive bedside technology to encourage children and their parents to...

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2008-10-08 11:39:03

It's a 500-pound gorilla that Robert Criss, Ph.D., professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, sees standing on the speaker's dais at political rallies, debates and campaigns. Its name is population growth. "Population growth is driving all of our resource problems, including water and energy. The three are intertwined," Criss says. "The United States has over 305 million people of the 6.7 billion on the planet. We are dividing a...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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