Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 14:04 EDT

Latest Washington University Stories

331ab4a18e16699079ad742f975fb5871
2010-04-26 15:41:40

Brain scans show persistent motivation regardless of payoff Whether it's for money, marbles or chalk, the brains of reward-driven people keep their game faces on, helping them win at every step of the way. Surprisingly, they win most often when there is no reward. That's the finding of neuroscientists at Washington University in St. Louis, who tested 31 randomly selected subjects with word games, some of which had monetary rewards of either 25 or 75 cents per correct answer, others of which...

66ff7636b5e44c4d19fe9d9cbc4c54bf1
2010-04-07 12:10:00

A genetic survey shows very little structure to moray eel populations in the Indo-Pacific. How, then, did 150 species of eel arise there? Joshua Reece became interested in moray eels in 2005 when he was applying to the PhD program at the University of Hawai'i. Instead of taking him on a campus tour, his host, Brian Bowen, PhD, a biologist at the university, took him on a dive. Along the southwest coast of Oahu, Reece looked under a rock ledge and was startled to see five different species of...

001806d1d7ce29d9daa27bfa025e4d4b1
2010-03-22 13:53:50

The National Science Foundation has awarded $1.65 million to a project led by Washington University in St. Louis physicist Ken Kelton to build an electrostatic levitation chamber that will be installed at the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oakridge National Laboratory. Using neutrons as a probe, the instrument will allow scientists to watch atoms in a suspended drop of liquid as the drop cools and solidifies. Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences and chair...

b00980d2d48fbda677a12da55aace8c01
2010-03-18 08:39:04

Sometimes a professional favor takes you down an interesting side street Jennifer Smith, PhD, associate professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was belly crawling her way to the end of a long, narrow tunnel carved in the rock at a desert oasis by Egyptians who lived in the time of the pharaohs. "I was crawling along when suddenly I felt stabbed in the chest," she says. "I looked down and saw that I was pressing against the...

dab01347002e87d22b8ce7f739d768411
2010-03-14 11:01:25

Nanoparticles provide a targeted version of photothermal therapy for cancer In a lecture he delivered in 1906, the German physician Paul Ehrlich coined the term Zuberkugel, or "magic bullet," as shorthand for a highly targeted medical treatment. Magic bullets, also called silver bullets, because of the folkloric belief that only silver bullets can kill supernatural creatures, remain the goal of drug development efforts today. A team of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis is...

4e902ac1d7a37f66f436e5bebbdda6611
2010-02-26 10:40:00

Since at least the days of Socrates, humans have been advised to "know thyself." And through all the years, many, including many personality and social psychologists, have believed the individual is the best judge of his or her own personality. Now a psychologist at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that we are not the know-it-alls that we think we are. Simine Vazire, Ph.D., Washington University assistant professor of psychology in Arts & Sciences, has found that the...

72e527cf1bf28155e3a797b4d0b8438c1
2010-02-25 14:47:35

A domestic ecological mystery Stories of environmental damage and their consequences always seem to take place far away and in another country, usually a tropical one with lush rainforests and poison dart frogs. In fact, similar stories starring familiar animals are unfolding all the time in our own backyards "” including gripping tales of diseases jumping from animal hosts to people when ecosystems are disrupted. This time we're not talking hemorrhagic fever and the rainforest. We're...

0df24516bdf7d6ef302adb26c513c68b1
2010-02-09 08:00:00

The first head-to-head comparison of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies produced from plants versus the same antibodies produced from mammalian cells has shown that plant-produced antibodies can fight infection equally well. Scientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Arizona State University conducted the comparison as a test of the potential for treating disease in developing nations with the significantly less expensive plant-based production technique. The...

03bd0e1527ed1d21201ef0e313446c2b
2010-02-07 11:02:20

In a study presented Saturday at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting â“ž¢, in Chicago, researchers unveiled findings that show that there is an increased risk of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), commonly known as stillbirth, in women who have fibroids. IUFD, or still birth, is rare and affects only six to seven out of every thousand births. The study, conducted by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis,...

532a3335b1492bc9bc8101341c93ae04
2010-02-04 14:36:12

Molecular biology of drought tolerance comes into focus Recent work at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on one of the most important events in earth-history, the conquest of land by plants 480 million years ago. No would-be colonizer could have survived on dry land without the ability to deal with dehydration, a major threat for organisms accustomed to soaking in water. Clues to how the first land plants managed to avoid drying out might be provided by bryophytes, a group that...