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Latest Washington University Stories

2009-04-03 11:13:22

'Taco shell' proteinResearchers at Washington University in St. Louis have figured out the orientation of a protein in the antenna complex to its neighboring membrane in a photosynthetic bacterium, a key find in the process of energy transfer in photosynthesis.Robert Blankenship, Ph.D., Markey Distinguished Professor of biology and chemistry in Arts & Sciences, led a team that for the first time combined chemical labeling with mass spectroscopy to verify the orientation. The team also...

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2009-03-31 08:29:35

New spin on laser-flash analysis Putting a new spin on an old technique, Anne M. Hofmeister, Ph.D., research professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, has revolutionized scientists' understanding of heat transport in the Earth's crust, the outermost solid shell of our planet. Temperature is an important driver of many geological processes, including the generation of magmas (molten rocks) in the deepest parts of the Earth's crust,...

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2009-03-18 09:15:45

Kind of a drag Last summer, it was very expensive to fill up a gas tank when the gasoline price hit close to four dollars a gallon. Transportation by road or air consumes fuel, which not only increases our vulnerability to foreign imports but also is a source of greenhouse gas emissions that will impact adverse change in climate and global warming. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is developing techniques that will lessen our monetary pain at the pump by reducing...

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2009-02-24 09:32:07

The rotating black hole has been described as one of nature's most perfect objects. As described by the Kerr solution of Einstein's gravitational field equations, its spacetime geometry is completely characterized by only two numbers "” mass and spin "” and is sometimes described by the aphorism "black holes have no hair.'' A particle orbiting a rotating black hole always conserves its energy and angular momentum, but otherwise traces a complicated twisting rosette pattern with no...

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2009-02-11 14:40:38

Building on plant virus research started more than 20 years ago, a biologist at Washington University in St. Louis and his colleague at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis have discovered a technology that reduces infection by the virus that causes Rice Tungro Disease, a serious limiting factor for rice production in Asia. Roger N. Beachy, Ph.D., WUSTL professor of biology in Arts & Sciences and president of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and Danforth Center...

2009-02-10 12:00:00

CHICAGO, Feb. 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- David G. Mutch, MD, Director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and Ira and Judith Gall Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, has been elected the 41st President of the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) at the organization's 40th Annual Meeting, held February 5-8, 2009 in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Mutch received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Carleton...

2009-02-10 06:00:00

ST. JOSEPH, Mich., Feb. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- GeneGo, Inc., the leading systems biology tools company, announced today that Becker Medical Library at Washington University in St. Louis has licensed MetaCore. The Becker Medical Library Bioinformatics@Becker program is a university wide resource which provides bioinformatics support for researchers and students. MetaCore is an easy to use data mining tool that provides users with fast easy access to up to date pertinent pathway information....

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2009-01-29 13:22:39

Brain processes stories as though they were real-life situations A new brain-imaging study is shedding light on what it means to "get lost" in a good book "” suggesting that readers create vivid mental simulations of the sounds, sights, tastes and movements described in a textual narrative while simultaneously activating brain regions used to process similar experiences in real life. "Psychologists and neuroscientists are increasingly coming to the conclusion that when we read a story...

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2009-01-14 06:26:40

Information obtained from a new application of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is worth its weight in gold to breast cancer patients. For the first time, Lihong Wang, Ph.D., Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in Radiology, and Younan Xia, Ph.D., James M. McKelvey Professor in Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in chemistry in Arts & Sciences, both at Washington University in St. Louis, have used gold...

2009-01-07 09:05:00

It's a little like finding out that Superman is actually Clark Kent.A team of biologists at Washington University in St. Louis has discovered that two vital cellular components, nuclear RNA Polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and V), found only in plants, are actually specialized forms of RNA Polymerase II, an essential enzyme of all eukaryotic organisms, including humans."We've caught evolution in the act," said Craig Pikaard, Ph.D., WUSTL professor of biology in Arts & Sciences. "We've known...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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