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2013-07-17 23:00:45

The lung transplant program at Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Hospital continues to be one of the best in the world. St. Louis, MO (PRWEB) July 17, 2013 It was one of the first programs of its kind in the country. Now the Washington University and Barnes-Jewish lung transplant program is celebrating 25 years of changing lives. The program’s first successful adult lung transplant was performed on July 17, 1988. Today, the program is one of the world’s largest, with surgeons...

2013-06-20 23:03:11

Barnes-Jewish Hospital is the first hospital in Missouri to earn Comprehensive Stroke Center status. Barnes-Jewish has been recognized by The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) as meeting The Joint Commission´s standards for Disease-Specific Care Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification. St. Louis, MO (PRWEB) June 20, 2013 The Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Hospital Stroke & Cerebrovascular Center is the first in...

2013-04-24 15:36:37

An investigational treatment for an inherited form of Lou Gehrig´s disease has passed an early phase clinical trial for safety, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Massachusetts General Hospital report. The researchers have shown that the therapy produced no serious side effects in patients with the disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The phase 1 trial´s results, available online in Lancet Neurology, also demonstrate...

2013-04-12 13:30:19

Using a miniature electronic device implanted in the brain, scientists have tapped into the internal reward system of mice, prodding neurons to release dopamine, a chemical associated with pleasure. The researchers, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, developed tiny devices, containing light emitting diodes (LEDs) the size of individual neurons. The devices activate brain cells with light. The scientists report their...

Wang's Technology Might Answer A Multitude Of Medical Questions
2013-03-25 15:09:02

Washington University in St. Louis [ Watch The Video Red Blood Cells Bifuracating in Capillary ] In an engineering breakthrough, a Washington University in St. Louis biomedical researcher has discovered a way to use light and color to measure oxygen in individual red blood cells in real time. The technology, developed by Lihong Wang, PhD, the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, could eventually be used to determine how oxygen is delivered to normal and...

2013-03-11 23:01:28

New strain of bacteria may clear up acne Probiotic Action explains the new research findings from Washington University. Miami, FL (PRWEB) March 11, 2013 Probiotic Action, known for the best acne treatment reports that George Weinstock, associate director of the Genome Institute at Washington University in Saint Louis, claims that studies of P.acnes bacteria genes, (the bacteria known to cause acne) have shown signs of a bacteria stand which may be responsible for preventing acne. In the...

Emerging Cancer Drugs May Cause Bone Tumors To Spread
2013-02-13 16:49:20

Washington University in St. Louis Cancer drugs should kill tumors, not encourage their spread. But new evidence suggests that an otherwise promising class of drugs may actually increase the risk of tumors spreading to bone, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The drugs, IAP antagonists, block survival signals that many cancer cells rely on to stay alive. Working in mice, the investigators found that targeting the same protein that makes...

Research Confirms Massive Louisiana Mound Was Built By Archaic Native Americans In Less Than 90 Days
2013-01-31 09:35:07

Washington University in St. Louis Nominated early this year for recognition on the UNESCO World Heritage List, which includes such famous cultural sites as the Taj Mahal, Machu Picchu and Stonehenge, the earthen works at Poverty Point, La., have been described as one of the world´s greatest feats of construction by an archaic civilization of hunters and gatherers. Now, new research in the current issue of the journal Geoarchaeology, offers compelling evidence that one of the...

Scientific Balloon Record Shattered By Super-TIGER
2013-01-23 09:53:00

Washington University in St. Louis Before he left for Antarctica in November, W. Robert Binns, principal investigator for Super-TIGER, said that he would be deliriously happy if the balloon carrying the cosmic-ray detector stayed up 30 days. It has now been up 45 days, floating serenely in the polar vortex registering hits by cosmic rays. Over the weekend it shattered the previous record of 42 days set by Cream I, another cosmic ray experiment that flew during the winter of 2004-2005....

Effect Of Invasive Plants On Species Richness Depends On Scale
2013-01-17 14:41:43

Washington University in St. Louis In Missouri forests, dense thickets of invasive honeysuckle decrease the light available to other plants, hog the attention of pollinators, and offer nutrient-stingy berries to migrating birds. They even release toxins to make it less likely native plants will germinate near them. Why, then, are recent popular science articles recommending a recalibration of the traditional no-tolerance attitude toward non-native species, suggesting that we´ve...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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