Quantcast

Latest Weather modification Stories

2008-07-23 12:00:45

By Neal P. Goswami, Bennington Banner, Vt. Jul. 23--BENNINGTON -- Southern Vermont Orchard was issued another citation Sunday for operating its "hail cannon" at night in violation of the town's noise ordinance. Meanwhile, town officials remain mum on how they plan to deal with future violations. Bennington Town Manager Stuart A. Hurd said the cannon was fired Sunday night, when the town's noise ordinance limits sounds to 45 decibels or less. Previous sound tests conducted by the...

2008-06-17 15:00:24

Los Angeles to resume controversial cloud-seeding project LOS ANGELES, June 16 (Xinhua) -- Facing severe water supply shortage, Los Angeles plans to launch a controversial cloud- seeding project that they believe will boost rainfall and raise the levels of local reservoirs, a newspaper report said Monday. The project, which will rely on injecting clouds with silver iodide particles, has won approval from Los Angeles county supervisors and is slated to begin this winter. Officials...

90ee71890a62f090dc744643f4513d871
2008-04-11 13:30:00

To prevent rain clouds from ruining the Olympics opening ceremony, China is preparing an arsenal of rockets and aircraft to disperse clouds so that dignitaries in the roofless "bird's nest" stadium don't get wet.The Chinese government is well known for its use of cloud seeding, a form of weather modification, which is the attempt to change the amount or type of precipitation that falls from clouds, by dispersing substances into the air that serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei.Officials...

22137caa6c9fe403f188f8d890f31a5e1
2008-02-29 00:15:00

A Montana State University professor and his colleagues have found evidence suggesting that airborne bacteria are globally distributed in the atmosphere and may play a large role in the cycle of precipitation. The research of David Sands, MSU professor of plant sciences and plant pathology, along with his colleagues Christine Foreman, an MSU professor of land resources and environmental sciences, Brent Christner from Louisiana State University and Cindy Morris, will be published today in the...

2008-01-30 13:45:00

Zhang Qian, head of weather manipulation at the Beijing Meteorological Bureau may have found a way to keep the opening ceremony at August's Olympic Games dry. The attempts to mitigate light rain have been successful thus far. The Bird's Nest Stadium, where the Olympics will be held, has no roof. Because of this, the bureau has been instructed to prevent wet weather on August 8th.  Thus far, Zhang Qian and the bureau have been able to prevent light rain, but she says that it is much more...

2008-01-10 00:00:00

A team of scientists from the Naval Research Laboratory, the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL's) Research Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has detected the lowest frequency radar echo from the moon ever seen with earth-based receivers. In the lunar echo experiment (more properly called a lunar bistatic radar experiment), the Air Force/Navy High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) high power transmitter, located...

2007-04-25 17:30:10

BEIJING -- Chance of showers during the 2008 Beijing Olympics: 50 percent. But Chinese meteorologists have a plan to bring sunshine. The meteorologists say they can force rain in the days before the Olympics, through a process known as cloud-seeding, to clean the air and ensure clear skies. China has been tinkering with artificial rainmaking for decades, but whether it works is a matter of debate among scientists. Weather patterns for the past 30 years indicate there is a 50 percent chance of...

2007-02-10 18:00:00

By Alex Breitler From his offices in Fresno, Steve Johnson explained how cloud seeders spent one of the driest Januaries on record: "We'd look at the forecast maps and pray," he said. Johnson's planes are soaring over the Sierra Nevada once again this week, scattering silver iodide particles to squeeze just a bit more snow out of some long-awaited storms. The twin-engine planes have been frozen to the ground for the most part this winter, said Johnson, general manager of Atmospherics Inc.,...

2006-07-02 20:21:29

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - China says its scientists make enough rain to fill the Yellow River; Moscow claims credit for sunshine for Red Square parades -- but confidence in other nations that humans can alter the weather has almost dried up. If it worked reliably, the use of aircraft and rockets to spread tiny chemical particles into the sky to "seed" or disperse clouds could be the answer to famine, drought, desertification, even global warming....

2006-05-05 19:12:41

BEIJING (AP) - Chinese weather specialists used chemicals to engineer Beijing's heaviest rainfall of the year, helping to relieve drought and rinse dust from China's capital, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Friday. Technicians with the Beijing Weather Modification Office fired seven rocket shells containing 163 cigarette-size sticks of silver iodide over the city's skies on Thursday, Xinhua said. The reaction that occurred brought as much as four-tenths of an inch of rain, the...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related