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Is The Western Wall In Jerusalem Wearing Away?
2014-08-13 03:48:17

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Discovery Of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques Visitors to the Western Wall in Jerusalem can see that some of its stones are extremely eroded. This is good news for people placing prayer notes in the wall's cracks and crevices, but presents a problem for engineers concerned about the structure’s stability. The Western Wall is a remnant of the ancient wall that surrounded the courtyard of the Jewish Temple in...

2014-06-09 14:51:10

University of New Hampshire For more than 40 years, policy makers have been working to reduce acid rain, a serious environmental problem that can devastate lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and animals that live in these ecosystems. Now new research funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station (NHAES) at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture indicates that lakes in New England and the Adirondack Mountains are recovering rapidly from the...

Reimagining How Earth Emerged Out Of Ice Age
2014-03-19 14:15:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers, publishing a paper in the journal Nature, say rapid erosion in mountain regions could explain why the Earth isn’t essentially still a snowball. Scientists have long believed that rocks pushed up to the surface by plate tectonics absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide, and volcanic processes are what helps to emit this CO2. However, despite this theory and a variety of other hypotheses being put forward to balance the...

How Mountains And Rivers Make Life Possible
2014-03-14 14:47:09

Stanford University Favorable conditions for life on Earth are enabled in part by the natural shuttling of carbon dioxide from the planet's atmosphere to its rocky interior and back again. Now Stanford scientists have devised a pair of math equations that better describe how topography, rock compositions and the movement of water through a landscape affects this vital recycling process. Scientists have long suspected that the so-called the geologic carbon cycle is responsible for...

Mountainous Ecosystems Acted Like A Thermostat For Millions Of Years
2014-02-06 14:21:46

University of Oxford For the first time, scientists have discovered how tree roots in the mountains may play an important role in controlling long-term global temperatures. Researchers from Oxford and Sheffield Universities have found that temperatures affect the thickness of the leaf litter and organic soil layers, as well as the rate at which the tree roots grow. In a warmer world, this means that tree roots are more likely to grow into the mineral layer of the soil, breaking down rock...

Earth’s CO2 And Climate Stabilized By Ancient Forests
2014-01-24 12:38:58

European Geosciences Union UK researchers have identified a biological mechanism that could explain how the Earth’s atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate were stabilized over the past 24 million years. When CO2 levels became too low for plants to grow properly, forests appear to have kept the climate in check by slowing down the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The results are now published in Biogeosciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)....

Eastern US Water Supplies Affected By Changing River Chemistry
2013-08-26 14:41:20

University of Maryland 25+ years of records show two-thirds of region's rivers are now alkaline -- a legacy of acid rain, researchers say Human activities are changing the basic chemistry of many rivers in the Eastern U.S. in ways that have potentially major consequences for urban water supplies and aquatic ecosystems, a University of Maryland-led study has found. In the first survey of its kind, a research team looked at long-term records of alkalinity trends in 97 rivers from...

2013-06-10 23:14:27

A recent study was done comparing the total percentage of fat determined by using the automated acid hydrolysis method vs. the traditional manual method (Mojonnier Method). We have created a power point presentation, several pdf´s and a conclusion of the study for you to see the latest data. Goshen, NY (PRWEB) June 10, 2013 The study consisted of over one thousand data points from a multitude of different samples and matrices. Samples ranged from 6 different types of chips, 46...

2012-05-31 11:09:08

The June GSA TODAY science article is now online and open access at http://www.geosociety.org/gsatoday/. In this issue, Gregory Retallack and Joshua Roering of the University of Oregon enter the long-standing debate as to whether rock platforms along coasts and rivers are the product of physical erosion or chemical weathering above the water table. Although the notion of wave-cut or stream-cut platforms is firmly entrenched in the literature, Retallack and Roering present the case that a...

Humans May Have Played Role In Loss of African Rainforests
2012-02-12 06:25:20

An influx of humans into the lush rainforests of Central Africa, and the deforestation that followed, may have played a role in changing the landscape of the region into the savannas and grasslands that exist there today, a team of French scientists claim in a new study. According to Rachel Nuwer of Science Now, lead author Germain Bayon, a geochemist at the French Research Institute for Exploration of the Sea in Plouzané, and colleagues originally intended to study the...


Latest Weathering Reference Libraries

Acid Rain
2013-04-01 10:21:17

Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic, meaning that is possesses high levels of hydrogen ions. It can have harmful effects on aquatic animals, plants, and infrastructure. Acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which react with the water molecules within the atmosphere to produce acids. Nitrogen oxides can be produced naturally by lightening strikes. Sulfur dioxide can be produced naturally by volcanic eruptions. The chemicals that are...

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Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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