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Latest Weed Stories

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2009-02-06 13:39:13

Global warming is likely to result in more preferred conditions for many of the most unwanted weeds to invade the West, researchers reported on Friday. Additionally, climate change may also allow farmers to restore native plants in some regions, said Bethany Bradley, Research Associate at Princeton and lead author of the study appearing in Global Change Biology. While the changing climate may rid the west of many invasive plants that already reside in the region, others are expected to take...

2009-01-26 07:00:00

- February 9-13 event in Orlando attracts participants from across the nation - Keynote speech by USDA expert to highlight agricultural research priorities and impact of 2008 Farm Bill LAWRENCE, Kan., Jan. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent developments and trends in weed management are the focus of an upcoming joint meeting of two of the nation's leading weed science organizations. The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) and the Southern Weed Science Society (SWSS) will meet February 9-13 at...

2008-12-29 16:23:43

Organic plant waste has proven to be an effective weed control for citrus trees, Egyptian researchers reported Monday. Researchers from the National Research Center in Giza, Egypt, studied the effects of plant mulches compared to synthetic mulch and other weed control methods on the quality of mandarin fruit, the American Society for Horticultural Science reported Monday in a news release. Dr. H.F. Abouziena, the project's lead researcher, said rice straw and cattail weeds create plant waste...

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2008-10-13 16:48:59

Scientists in Britain believe a Japanese plant-eating predator may help solve the problem of a "superweed" that is now spreading across the country. Japanese knotweed, like many other non-native, invasive plants, was first introduced to Britain for horticulture. Its ornamental leaves, 10-13 ft stems and clusters of white flowers made it attractive in gardens. However, it has since plagued the environment, and this year has been particularly bad for knotweed spread in the UK. Making matters...

2008-10-03 18:00:15

By Booker T Leigh When the leaves start to fall, most homeowners are ready to forget about plant disease and insects until next summer. Normally, fall is the best time to start controlling next year's diseases and insects. A little work now can prevent a lot of problems next year. Here are some things to do to help control disease and insect problems for next year: Rake up and destroy leaves of all fruit trees and small fruits. Also, remove any rotten or dried-up fruit still hanging...

2008-10-01 15:00:21

By BUNTING, Finbarr Weeds may not be sexy, but as any environmentalist will tell you they can do as much damage to the natural environment as any crawly critters. The hard work and dedication of Friends of Barrett Bush volunteers has seen them made this year's recipient of the Weedbuster Awards. The Weedbuster Awards were set up in 2006 to recognise the dedication of volunteers in improving the environment and raising awareness of the damage weeds can cause. Wendy Mead,...

2008-09-21 09:00:17

By MARY REID BARROW By Mary Reid Barrow Correspondent So, you've spent most every summer weekend mowing your lawn. Now you're about to spend your fall weekends fertilizing and planting grass seed so you will have even more grass to mow next spring and summer. Growing grass is kind of like doing the laundry. It's never done. But aren't there limits to how much lawn work we should do? Around here it's hard to plant a carefree lawn because fescue and other lawn grasses don't grow...

2008-09-18 18:00:29

By DYKES, Mervyn These fast-growing monsters, capable of adapting to many different habitats, are among the most invasive of species. -------- ------------ One of the world's biggest "weeds" has the Department of Conservation (DOC) ready to do battle in the bush areas of Manawatu. These are not typical back-garden weeds, but fast-growing monsters reaching heights of more than 25m and capable of broadcasting seeds over extensive areas. They are numbered among the most invasive of...

2008-09-08 18:00:20

By JULIE H. MANN For the Maryland Gazette Many homeowners wage rigorous chemical warfare on weeds, applying regular doses of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. They do it to eliminate grubs, crabgrass, wiregrass, spurge, chickweed, and clover. Not Wendy Osborn. The longtime Severna Park gardener decided last year to invest in a radical approach. She went green, using passive solar power, plastic and patience to rid her family's lawn of pesky weeds. Surprising their...

2008-08-30 12:00:28

The best time to fertilize cool season lawns grasses, like tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass, is in September, as they respond to shorter days and cooler temperatures with renewed growth. Use a turfgrass fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, which appears as the first number in the three-number sequence called the fertilizer analysis that appears on the bag. Distribute fertilizer according to directions on the bag; either a gravity flow (drop) spreader or a rotary/cyclone type can be...