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Latest Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Stories

2012-07-20 00:15:00

Genome research for the health of the poorest of the poor Belgian scientists of the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) in Antwerp, Belgium made a breakthrough in bridging high tech molecular biology research on microbial pathogens and the needs of the poorest of the poor. After sequencing the complete genome of Leishmania donovani (a parasite causing one of the most important tropical diseases after malaria) in hundreds of clinical isolates, they identified a series of mutations specific...

Ethiopian Genetics Could Verify 'Queen of Sheba' Legend
2012-06-22 08:04:57

UK researchers studying the genomes of Ethiopian people have discovered similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, proving genetic evidence that may support the tale of the legendary Queen of Sheba. Ethiopians are described by representatives of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, one of the organizations involved in the study, as one of the most genetically diverse cultures in the world. By studying their DNA, the researchers detected mixing from some Ethiopians and...

2012-06-21 21:04:28

Diversity within Ethiopian genomes reveals imprints of historical events Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions. The team detected mixing between some Ethiopians and...

2012-05-16 22:52:06

Landscape of cancer genes and mutational processes in breast cancer In a study published today in Nature, researchers describe nine new genes that drive the development of breast cancer. This takes the tally of all genes associated with breast cancer development to 40. The team examined all the genes in the genomes of 100 cases of breast cancer. The mutated cancer-causing genes were different in different cancer samples, indicating that breast cancer is genetically very diverse....

2012-05-09 05:29:39

(Ivanhoe Newswire) —Last year it killed an estimated 655,000 people. Now researchers are developing new ways to block the transmission of Plasmodium, the parasite responsible for human malaria. Experts say the research could represent a new strategy for controlling the spread of infection. According to the World Health Organization, more than 200 million people contract malaria each year. Experts say in order to combat the deadly disease, new tools have to be developed to prevent new...

2012-04-10 22:21:41

PHILADELPHIA and LONDON, April 11, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters today announced The Hottest Research of 2011, a ranking of the most influential scientific researchers and research papers of the year by Science Watch(®), its open Web resource for science metrics and analysis. Tracking researchers whose recent published papers recorded notably higher levels of citations during 2011, along with the most highly cited individual...

2012-03-29 02:27:15

Researchers identify genetic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells In the largest study of its kind, researchers have profiled genetic changes in cancer with drug sensitivity in order to develop a personalised approach to cancer treatments. The team uncovered hundreds of associations between mutations in cancer genes and sensitivity to anticancer drugs. One of the key responses the team found was that cells from a childhood bone cancer, Ewing's sarcoma, respond to a drug that is...

Gene Can Transform Mild Flu Into A Life-threatening Disease
2012-03-26 07:13:43

An international team of researchers has discovered a human genetic flaw that could explain why influenza makes some people more sick than others. Reporting in the journal Nature, British and American researchers, led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) in the UK, said the variant of the IFITM3 gene was much more common in people hospitalized for the flu than in those who were able to fight the disease at home. The researchers said this could explain why during the 2009/10...