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Latest Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Stories

2012-01-26 02:11:22

Research led by scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has exploited a revolutionary genetic technique to discover how human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) drugs target the parasite which causes the disease. The new knowledge could help lead to the development of better treatments for the tens of thousands of people in sub-Saharan Africa who are affected each year. The findings, published in Nature, are based on the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes and...

2012-01-12 21:39:16

A team of geneticists and computational biologists in the UK today reveal how an ancient mechanism is involved in gene control and continues to drive genome evolution. The new study is published in the journal Cell. To function properly, mammalian tissues require the protein CTCF, which has several key activities including the regulation of genes and interaction with proteins in the cell's nucleus to alter gene activity. CTCF acts by binding to DNA and plays a role in diseases such as HIV...

2011-12-20 18:10:38

A new candidate malaria vaccine with the potential to neutralize all strains of the most deadly species of malaria parasite has been developed by a team led by scientists at the University of Oxford. The results of this new vaccine independently confirm the utility of a key discovery reported last month from scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute who had identified this target within the parasite as a potential 'Achilles' heel' that could hold significant promise for vaccine...

2011-12-14 11:49:04

Jamb and Jamc are essential proteins for the fusion of muscle cells Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered two proteins that are essential for the fusion of muscle cells to build muscle fibers. Their discovery might help us better understand and treat illnesses such as muscle-wasting disorders and diseases of bone over-growth, in which cellular fusion is an important feature. Cellular fusion is necessary to form larger cells that have specific functions...

Malaria Parasite Discovery May Lead To Vaccine
2011-11-10 14:08:10

[ Watch the Video ] Researchers have revealed a new discovery in understanding how a malaria parasite invades human red blood cells. The team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute said they found that the parasite relies on a single receptor on the red blood cell's surface to invade. Malaria kills about a million people every year, most of them being children in Africa under the age of five. The blood stage of the parasite's lifecycle starts when it invades human red blood...

2011-11-07 11:45:51

A jumping gene named Sleeping Beauty plays vital role in investigating cancer pathway A jumping gene with the fairy tale name "Sleeping Beauty" has helped to unlock vital clues for researchers investigating the genetics of colorectal cancer. A study published today used the Sleeping Beauty transposon system to profile the repertoire of genes that can drive colorectal cancer, identifying many more than previously thought. Around one third of these genes are mutated in human cancer, which...

2011-10-28 12:11:35

Parasite genomes speak of evolution by changes in gene, region and chromosome number, not by mutation in genes Two remarkable discoveries were today revealed by researchers into genome analysis of Leishmania parasites. These results uncovered a surprising level of variation at the genome structure level. First, they found that the DNA sequence of individual strains of each species populations is almost completely identical. It appears that only a small number of genes may cause...

2011-10-12 23:11:52

New gene therapy methods accurately correct mutation in patient's stem cells, bringing personalized cell therapies one step closer For the first time, scientists have cleanly corrected a human gene mutation in a patient's stem cells. The result, reported in Nature on Wednesday 12 October, brings the possibility of patient-specific therapies closer to becoming a reality. The team, led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge, targeted a gene...

Culling Won’t Help Tasmanian Devil Populations
2011-10-05 08:45:59

Populations of Tasmanian devils in parts of Australia are suffering from Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) that has wiped out more than 90 percent of individual animals in some areas. Because of this, the animals have been the subject of a culling, or a purposeful killing of a large number of the animals, with hopes of removing the cancer from the general population. Conservation biologists began the cull in 2004. However a study in the Journal of Applied Ecology confirms that the...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.