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Latest White blood cell Stories

2011-11-21 12:41:06

Hydrogen peroxide isn't just that bottled colorless liquid in the back of the medicine cabinet that's used occasionally for cleaning scraped knees and cut fingers. It's also a natural chemical in the body that rallies at wound sites, jump-starting immune cells into a series of events. A burst of hydrogen peroxide causes neutrophils, the immune system's first responders, to rush to the wound to fight microorganisms, remove damaged tissue and then start the inflammation process....

2011-11-14 23:39:49

The stealth art of infectious agents: Researchers uncover why the body can't defend against tuberculosis Tuberculosis, which kills over 2 million people each year, is caused primarily by infectious bacteria known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis — or Mtb. Mtb targets human immune cells as part of its strategy to avoid detection, effectively neutralizing the body's immune response. Up until now, scientists had a general understanding of the process, but researchers in the Immunity and...

2011-11-01 21:02:19

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology demonstrates that elevated body temperature plays a vital role on the generation of effective T-cell mediated immune response With cold and flu season almost here, the next time you're sick, think twice before taking something for your fever. That's because scientists have found more evidence that elevated body temperature helps certain types of immune cells to work better. This research is reported in the November 2011 issue of...

2011-10-17 21:56:38

How our skin says, 'Don't worry, these are good guys,' revealed today in PNAS There are more bacteria living on our skin and in our gut than cells in our body. We need them. But until now no-one knew how the immune system could tell that these bacteria are harmless. Centenary Institute researchers in Sydney have discovered a set of peacekeepers–immune cells in the outer layers of our skin that stop us from attacking friendly bacteria. The work will open the way to new...

2011-10-10 09:12:58

Interfering with cell recruitment reduces damaging inflammation in animals´ models of several disorders Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers — along with collaborators from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals — have found a way to block, in an animal model, the damaging inflammation that contributes to many disease conditions. In their report receiving early online publication in Nature Biotechnology, the investigators...

2011-09-15 12:28:41

Scientists reveal how a type of white blood cells, called Natural Killer cells, protect the body from tumors and virus-infected cells Scientists reveal in more detail than ever before how white blood cells kill diseased tissue using deadly granules, in research published today in PLoS Biology. The researchers, from Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, used 'optical' laser tweezers and a super-resolution microscope to see the inner workings of white blood cells at the...

2011-09-14 13:26:00

With New Tool, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Show How Immune System Attacks Infected Cells PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Making use of a new "super resolution" microscope that provides sharp images at extremely small scales, scientists have achieved unprecedented views of the immune system in action. The new tool, a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope, shows how granules from natural killer cells pass through openings in dynamic cell...

2011-09-14 11:31:38

With new tool, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia researchers show how immune system attacks infected cells Making use of a new "super resolution" microscope that provides sharp images at extremely small scales, scientists have achieved unprecedented views of the immune system in action. The new tool, a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope, shows how granules from natural killer cells pass through openings in dynamic cell structures to destroy their targets: tumor cells and...

2011-09-08 09:43:27

Like humans, mice that live in their natural habitat encounter bacteria and other pathogens that exercise their immune system, yet the lab mice typically used in immunology studies are raised in isolation from most diseases. A study on natural killer cells in wild mice published this week in Molecular Ecology examines the hypothesis that the unsterile living conditions faced by humans and wild mice may improve the readiness of the immune system to fight new infections. The findings suggest...

2011-09-01 11:30:13

The Findings Open the Door to the Development of Novel Drugs for Early-Stage Tumors Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown that a particular white blood cell plays a direct role in the development and spread of cancerous tumors. Their work sheds new light on the development of the disease and points toward novel strategies for treating early-stage cancers. The study was published in September 2011 print issue of the American Journal of Pathology. Scripps Research...