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Latest White nose syndrome Stories

Grants Awarded For White-Nose Syndrome Research
2013-06-28 05:42:58

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced grant awards to twenty-eight states for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. The grants, which range in size from just under $7,000 to approximately $50,000, will be used by state natural resource agencies to support research, monitor bat populations and detect and respond to white-nose syndrome, a disease that afflicts bats. "White-nose syndrome has spread rapidly from one state in...

White Nose Syndrome Detected Earlier In Bats Thanks To Better DNA Analysis
2013-03-14 08:15:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers studying White Nose Syndrome (WNS) identified a fungus called Geomyces destructans as the cause of the devastating disease, but until now have been unable to detect it without finding dead or dying bats. New research by a team of US Forest Service scientists and partners has identified additional species of Geomyces. The study, published in the journal Mycologia, describes the development of a highly sensitive...

2013-01-29 10:09:59

Research by U.S. Forest Service scientists forecasts profound changes over the next 50 years in the summer range of the endangered Indiana bat. In an article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Forest Service Southern Research Station researchers Susan Loeb and Eric Winters discuss the findings of one of the first studies designed to forecast the responses of a temperate zone bat species to climate change. The researchers modeled the current maternity distribution of Indiana...

Living The Night Life Bats Are Needed All The Time-Not Just On Halloween
2012-10-31 15:03:13

National Science Foundation Researchers are identifying the important ecological and economic contributions of bats; gleaning lessons from incredible bat abilities that may advance technology; and helping to battle a new fatal bat epidemic The sight of bats hanging upside down in creepy caves or fleeing in fluttery flocks from their subterranean haunts at dusk like "bats out of hell" may spook even the most rational, otherwise unflappable observer. Nevertheless, on every day (and...

Bats Get Help From A Manmade Cave
2012-09-15 05:28:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An artificial cave, designed to help protect bats from a fungal ailment that to date has killed more than six million of the creatures throughout North America, has been constructed by conservationists in the woods of Tennessee, according to various media outlets published Friday. The project, which Randall Dickerson of the Associated Press (AP) reports cost an estimated $300,000 and was built by The Nature Conservancy, is...

Social Bats More Likely To Pay Higher Price From White-nose Syndrome
2012-07-04 08:13:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New studies conducted by biologists at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) show that the effects of white-nose syndrome, a deadly bat disease, may be worse in bat colonies who are increasingly social during hibernation. The study found that bat species that tend to cluster together during hibernation, even with declining populations, would continue to spread white-nose syndrome. In 2006, white-nose syndrome made a dramatic...


Latest White nose syndrome Reference Libraries

Ozark Big-eared Bat, Corynorhinus townsendii ingens
2012-08-09 07:48:16

The Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens) is the largest of all five subspecies under Corynorhinus townsendii. Its range is highly limited to a few caves in the central southern areas of the United States. Its range once included Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, but these areas were abandoned due to human activity and disturbances.  Its other common names include the long-eared bat, the lump-nosed bat, and the western big-eared bat. The Ozark big-eared bat has large,...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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