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Latest William Lau Stories

Global Warming Could Increase Extreme Rainfall And Drought: NASA
2013-05-04 07:11:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Global warming may increase the risk for extreme rainfall and drought, a new NASA-led modeling study predicts. The study, to be published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, demonstrates for the first time how rising carbon dioxide concentrations could affect the entire range of rainfall types on Earth. The research team analyzed computer simulations from 14 climate models that indicated wet regions of the world, such as the...

2013-05-03 12:21:06

WASHINGTON, May 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A NASA-led modeling study provides new evidence that global warming may increase the risk for extreme rainfall and drought. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The study shows for the first time how rising carbon dioxide concentrations could affect the entire range of rainfall types on Earth. Analysis of computer simulations from 14 climate models indicates wet regions of the world, such as the equatorial Pacific...

Extreme 2010 Russian Fires And Pakistan Floods Linked Meteorologically
2011-08-31 08:49:43

  Two of the most destructive natural disasters of 2010 were closely linked by a single meteorological event, even though they occurred 1,500 miles (2,414 km) apart and were of completely different natures, a new NASA study suggests. The research finds that the same large-scale meteorological event – an abnormal Rossby wave – sparked extreme heat and persistent wildfires in Russia as well as unusual downstream wind patterns that shifted rainfall in the Indian monsoon...

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2009-12-15 06:55:00

Soot from fire in an unventilated fireplace wafts into a home and settles on the surfaces of floors and furniture. But with a quick fix to the chimney flue and some dusting, it bears no impact on a home's long-term environment. A new modeling study from NASA confirms that when tiny air pollution particles we commonly call soot "“ also known as black carbon "“ travel along wind currents from densely populated south Asian cities and accumulate over a climate hotspot called the...

2009-12-14 16:19:00

GREENBELT, Md., Dec. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A NASA-led study has found new evidence that a "heat pump" effect, driven by emissions of soot, or black carbon, contributes as much (or more) to atmospheric warming in the Himalayas as greenhouse gases. This warming fuels the melting of glaciers and could threaten fresh water resources in a region that is home to more than a billion people. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Tiny, dark-colored aerosols --...

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2007-03-28 15:55:00

A recent NASA study suggests that tiny dust particles may have foiled forecasts that the 2006 hurricane season would be another active one. In June and July 2006, there were several significant dust storms over the Sahara Desert in Africa. As this dust traveled westward into the Atlantic, satellite data show that the particles blocked sunlight from reaching the ocean surface, causing ocean waters to cool. These cooler waters may have impeded some storminess since hurricanes rely on warm...

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2007-03-05 15:40:00

Breaking news in recent years has been swamped with stories of extreme weather -- flash floods in East Asia, prolonged drought in Africa, destructive hurricanes like Hurricane Katrina, heavy monsoon rainfall in South Asia, and an historic heat wave in Europe. The effects of these weather crises have been devastating, and their frequency seemingly on the rise. With an understanding that the societal effect of increased rainfall is huge, researchers have had a key question at the center of a...

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2007-01-29 09:18:37

When a small pebble drops into a serene pool of water, it causes a ripple in the water in every direction, even disturbing distant still waters. NASA researchers have found a similar process at work in the atmosphere: tiny particles in the air called aerosols can cause a rippling effect on the climate thousands of miles away from their source region. The researchers found that dust particles from the desert regions in northern Africa can produce climate changes as far away as the northern...

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2006-09-07 15:40:00

Who would think that something like dust in the air could trigger rain? According to a new NASA study, this is just what's happening over South Asia's Tibetan Plateau. Very small dust particles called aerosols blow in from desert regions and collect in the atmosphere over the plateau's slopes early in the region's monsoon season, helping trigger rainfall. A monsoon is a seasonal shift in wind direction that alternately brings very wet and then very dry seasons to India and much of Southeast...