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Wind shear Reference Libraries

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Weather Map Identification
2012-07-17 21:51:43

It is very important to understand what you are looking at when working with weather maps. In the image above we are looking at surface wind barbs. Surface wind barbs help us to identify which direction the wind is blowing and also the speed of the wind. If we look in the Northern Gulf of Mexico just to the south of Mississippi we see a wind barb in blue. This wind barb is from the East and...

Wind shear
2009-07-18 14:50:11

Wind Shear (windshear, wind gradient) is described as difference in wind speed and direction over a short distance in the atmosphere. Wind shear is broken down into vertical and horizontal components. Horizontal wind shear is seen across weather fronts and near coastal regions. A vertical wind shear is found near the surface, or at upper levels of the atmosphere. Wind shear is a meteorological...

Cirrus
2009-07-04 15:10:05

Cirrus clouds are thin wisplike strands, sometimes accompanied by patches. Their shape and arrangement lead to their common name of "mare's tail". These clouds can be so extensive that they are virtually identical to one another and hard to tell apart. Sometimes high altitude convection produces another form of cirrus called cirrocumulus. Many cirrus clouds produce hair-like filaments made of...

Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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