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Latest Wnt signaling pathway Stories

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2009-08-17 16:45:00

 A tissue-repair-and-regeneration pathway in the human body, including wound healing, is essential for the early lung to develop properly. Genetically engineered mice fail to develop lungs when two molecules in this pathway, Wnt2 and Wnt2b, are knocked out. The findings are described this week in Developmental Cell."We wanted to know the answer to a seemingly simple question: What is required to generate the lung in mammals?" asked senior author Edward Morrisey, PhD, Associate Professor...

2009-08-06 14:09:52

Investigators at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham) and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have made the first comparative, large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. The data may help stem cell researchers understand the mechanisms that determine whether stem cells divide or differentiate, what types of cells they become and how to control those complex mechanisms to facilitate development of new...

2009-07-08 06:23:00

LA JOLLA, Calif., and BARCELONA, July 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Fate Therapeutics, Inc. announced today the presentation of data from its research on small molecule modulators of the Wnt pathway for osteo-regeneration at the 7th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) in Barcelona, Spain. In its findings, the Company demonstrated that selected Wnt activators induce the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to mature, bone-forming osteoblasts. The study...

2009-07-07 06:58:00

A new study reveals the genetic foundation of what causes lung cancer to quickly spread. Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) found the same cellular pathway involved in the spread of colorectal cancer is also responsible for providing lung cancer with a better ability to get into and take over other organs without delay and with little need to adapt to its new environment. Researchers looked at large collections of lung tumor samples and found a pathway called the...

2009-07-02 13:08:40

A new study by researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) reveals the genetic underpinnings of what causes lung cancer to quickly metastasize, or spread, to the brain and the bone "“ the two most prominent sites of lung cancer relapse. The study will be published online in the journal Cell on July 2.Researchers discovered that the same cellular pathway that has been shown to be involved with the spread of colorectal cancer is also responsible for providing lung cancer...

2009-07-01 13:56:06

A molecule called telomerase, best known for enabling unlimited cell division of stem cells and cancer cells, has a surprising additional role in the expression of genes in an important stem cell regulatory pathway, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The unexpected finding may lead to new anticancer therapies and a greater understanding of how adult and embryonic stem cells divide and specialize."Telomerase is the factor that accounts for the unlimited division of...

2009-07-01 10:53:52

The joint research, funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the UK MS Society as well as the National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, was conducted by scientists at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and University of Cambridge and was published today (01 July) in the journal Genes and Development.Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease which is caused by the body's immune system attacking nerve fibers and their protective insulation,...

2009-06-02 08:42:09

Cancer develops when cells known as cancer stem cells begin to divide in an uncontrolled manner. Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified roles for the gene PTEN, which is already well known for its ability to suppress tumor growth, and for several pathways linked to PTEN in the growth of cells that give rise to breast cancer. The work, published in this week's issue of the open-access journal PLoS Biology, also reports that a drug that...

2009-02-13 11:29:47

Taking clues from their stem cell research, investigators at the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) and Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham) have discovered that a signaling pathway involved in normal pancreatic development is also associated with type 2 diabetes. Their findings, published online January 9 in Experimental Diabetes Research, could provide a potential new target for therapy. Pamela Itkin-Ansari, Ph.D., assistant adjunct professor at the UC San Diego...

2009-02-03 11:31:10

U.S. medical scientists have identified two chemical compounds that can possibly disrupt the growth of many types of cancer and degenerative diseases. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers screened a chemical library of 200,000 compounds to find the chemicals that can be used to study and possibly manipulate cellular pathways. The identification of these chemicals and their targets within this cellular pathway represents an important step in developing therapeutic...