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Latest Wolf-Rayet star Stories

NASA's Swift Team Collects More Than 100 Snapshots For Image Gallery Gift
2012-12-31 10:31:00

NASA Of the three telescopes carried by NASA's Swift satellite, only one captures cosmic light at energies similar to those seen by the human eye. Although small by the standards of ground-based observatories, Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) plays a critical role in rapidly pinpointing the locations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the brightest explosions in the cosmos. But as the proxy to the human eye aboard Swift, the UVOT takes some amazing pictures. The Swift team is...

Stellar Winds Of Two Massive Stars Tracked Using X-Rays
2012-10-12 16:48:42

[Watch the Video: X-ray Satellites Monitor the Clashing Winds of a Colossal Binary] [Watch the Video: Simulation of Colliding Stellar Wind Binary] [Watch the Video: Simulation of Binary Star System] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Astronomers have X-rayed the stellar winds of two massive stars that are orbiting around one another. Stellar winds can trigger the collapse of surrounding clouds of gas and dust to form new stars, and can also blast the...

Seagull Nebula
2012-09-26 13:55:54

Watch the Video: [ Zooming in on the Seagull Nebula ] Watch the Video: [ Panning Across the Head of the Seagull Nebula ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new image taken by the European Space Observatory's La Silla Observatory shows off a stellar nursery nicknamed the Seagull Nebula. This nebula looks like the head of the seagull, and glows brightly due to the energetic radiation from a hot young star that sits at its heart. Nebulae are interstellar...

When Massive Stars Collide, Monsters Are Formed
2012-08-07 13:31:56

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Astronomers now believe the "monster stars" located in the nearby galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) were formed through the merger of lighter stars. The team wrote in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the group of stars may have formed while smaller stars were in a tight binary system. In 2010, scientists discovered these supermassive stars, one of which is more than 300 times the mass of the...

Searching For Supernova Progenitors
2012-08-04 06:23:15

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A progenitor of a type 1a supernova may have been found, according to findings published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Astronomers believe that type 1a supernovae are thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf star that is part of a binary system, which is two stars that are physically close and orbit a common center of mass. The white dwarf has mass gradually given to it by its companion star, and...

Neighboring Black Hole Set To Collide With Gas Cloud In 2013
2012-06-27 05:08:04

[ Watch the Video ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com According to a post by the European Research Media Center, the black hole in the center of our galaxy is about to meet up with a giant gas cloud in 2013. The celestial spectacle will provide astronomers with a prime front-row seat of Sagittarius A passing by a gas cloud at only 36 light-hours, or about 24 million miles. Although the distance between the two celestial objects seems far, it is extremely close in astronomical...

2012-03-14 21:18:03

Using radio and infrared telescopes, astronomers have obtained a first tantalizing look at a crucial early stage in star formation. The new observations promise to help scientists understand the early stages of a sequence of events through which a giant cloud of gas and dust collapses into dense cores that, in turn, form new stars. The scientists studied a giant cloud about 770 light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus. They used the European Space Agency's Herschel Space...

New Spitzer Image Shows Space Nursery
2012-01-11 04:18:52

The stars we see today weren't always as serene as they appear, floating alone in the dark of night. Most stars, likely including our sun, grew up in cosmic turmoil - as illustrated in a new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The image shows one of the most active and turbulent regions of star birth in our galaxy, a region called Cygnus X. The choppy cloud of gas and dust lies 4,500 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus the Swan. Cygnus X was named by radio astronomers,...

Image 1 - Ancient Stars Hint At Prehistory Of The Milky Way
2011-11-16 03:58:29

Some of the oldest stars in the Milky Way — a kind of stellar fossils in the outer reaches of our galaxy, contain abnormally large amounts of heavy elements like gold, platinum and uranium. Where these large amounts came from has been a mystery for researchers, since they are usually seen in much later generations of stars. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have been studying these ancient stars for several years with ESO's giant telescopes in Chile in order to trace the origin of...


Latest Wolf-Rayet star Reference Libraries

6_d67b2db586c7facec8388b5df78e57912
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Star -- A star is a self-gravitating sphere of plasma in hydrostatic equilibrium that generates energy in its interior through the process of nuclear fusion. Energy from this process radiates into space as electromagnetic radiation and neutrinos. Star formation and evolution As learned by star formation astronomers, stars are born in molecular clouds, regions of higher density of matter, and form by gravitational instability inside those clouds. High mass stars illuminate powerfully...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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