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Loss Of A Breeding Wolf Can Be Devastating But Does Not

Loss Of A Breeding Wolf Can Be Devastating, But Does Not Always Spell Doom For The Pack

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The loss of a breeding wolf can be a devastating event for a wolf pack, but a new study shows it may not spell the end, according to a recent statement from the Institute of Arctic Biology at...

Latest Wolves Stories

2014-02-18 23:28:19

The Wolf Facts website was created to help those interested in wolves find relevant facts covering to this creature. (PRWEB) February 18, 2014 The new Wolf Facts website has been created to help those researching the different types of wolves from around the world. The site is divided into a number of sections, each containing accurate wolf facts. The site doesn’t just feature lists of facts, but incorporates those details into articles covering each of the different topics. On the...

Wolves Learn From Each Other Better Than Dogs
2014-01-31 07:52:25

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Although wolves and dogs are closely related, they show some striking differences. Scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken experiments that suggest that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. The scientists believe that cooperation among wolves is the basis of the understanding between dogs and humans. Their findings...

Study Shows Wolves Can Learn From Observing Humans
2013-12-04 18:49:59

Frontiers Wolves can learn from observing humans and pack members where food is hidden and recognize when humans only pretend to hide food, reports a study for the first time in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology. These findings imply that when our ancestors started to domesticate dogs, they could have built on a pre-existing ability of wolves to learn from others, not necessarily pack members. A paper published recently in the journal Science suggested that humans...

2013-10-27 23:03:46

Royal Flush Havanese gives you the facts about a dog's mouth. (PRWEB) October 27, 2013 To let the canine family member “doggy kiss” or not? It’s certainly an issue that divides doglovers. Some find it a natural mode and expression of human/canine affection and others find it downright repulsive. In-between these two extreme reactions, there is certainly a lot of middle ground. Royal Flush Havanese presents the facts regarding this issue. What are the possible dangers of letting...

Wolf Howls Based On Social Connections
2013-08-23 04:36:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The howl of a wolf can be one of the most haunting and mysterious sounds of the forest. While scientists aren’t exactly sure why the animals howl, a new study suggests that the reason has something to do with social relationships within a pack. In a recently published report in the journal Current Biology, a team of European researchers described how when a wolf leaves a pack, its pack-mates will howl based on the quality of their...

Gray Wolves Losing Endangered Species Protection
2013-06-08 09:17:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online This week, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced that the nation´s gray wolf population has recovered to the point that it can safely be removed from the threatened and endangered species list. Environmental groups are concerned that this move is premature. According to an NBC News report, the FWS submitted two proposals. In the first, the wildlife service would delist the wolves and return management of them...

Study Determines Why Dogs Can Be Tamed, While Wolves Remain Wild
2013-01-18 06:58:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Dogs and wolves are genetically very similar, which has made it difficult for scientists to understand why dogs are happy to become "man's best friend" while wolves remain fiercely wild. Kathryn Lord, doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, suggests the different behaviors are related to the animals' earliest sensory experiences and the critical period of socialization. Previous to this study, little was known...

Italian Wolf Prefers Wild Boar Say Researchers
2012-12-21 10:59:11

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a group of British scientists has provided a more detailed look into the selective diet of wolves living in northwestern Italy. Wolves are an apex predator across Europe and the new insights could translate into more informed conservation strategies for policymakers as well as better protective measures for the region´s livestock industry, which can be affected by wolf predation. According to the...

Researchers Uncover Dire Wolf Fossils Near Las Vegas
2012-12-18 12:02:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers announced that they have discovered fossil remains from a dire wolf, revealing the first confirmation that the extinct predator once stalked the Silver State. UNLV geologist Josh Bonde found the wolf´s metapodial (foot bone) last year while surveying the Upper Las Vegas Wash, located just northwest of Las Vegas. They were later able to confirm that the bone is between 10,000...


Latest Wolves Reference Libraries

Dire Wolf, Canis dirus
2012-05-04 12:37:48

The dire wolf (Canis dirus) is an extinct wolf that was most common to North and South America. This carnivorous mammal lived for approximately 1.79 million years, existing throughout the Irvingtonian stage to the Rancholabrean stage of the Pleistocene era. It is related to the grey wolf, although it was larger and has no direct line to any living species. In 1854, the type specimen of the dire wolf was found in Evansville, Indiana. Joseph Granville Norwood acquired the specimen, a...

42_e645fe13d67ff50c872fc3a12739a082
2007-12-21 13:40:21

The Southern-East Asian Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), also known as the Turkish or Iranian Wolf, is a subspecies of Gray Wolf which ranges from Northern Israel, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Iran. Israel seems to be the last hope for the Southern-East Asian Wolf's survival in the Middle East because it is the only country in the region where they have legal protection. There are between 150-250 wolves all over northern and central Israel. The biggest dangers to the wolves in...

42_6dac4236753cb3c06421ac3daa00f3b7
2007-12-21 13:38:46

The Mexican Gray Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), is the rarest, most genetically distinct subspecies of the Gray Wolf in North America. Until recent times, the Mexican Gray Wolf ranged the Sonora and Chihuahua Deserts from central Mexico to western Texas, southern New Mexico, and central Arizona. By the turn of the 20th century, reduction of natural prey like deer and elk caused many wolves to begin attacking domestic livestock, which led to intensive efforts by government agencies and...

42_49e251d97abff2eea9e7b08a18f8ac75
2007-12-21 13:36:58

The Eastern Timber Wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), is an endangered subspecies of the Gray Wolf and is native to North America. "Timber Wolf" was once referred to any North American wolf that lived within forested areas, but this designation has been more recently reserved for this particular subspecies of gray wolf. The Eastern Timber Wolf is one of the larger subspecies of gray wolves, especially in length, which generally varies from 58.5 to 70 inches, including the tail. Larger individuals...

42_edde581db84e4f3b2758dc9811c67362
2007-12-21 13:35:05

The Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos), also called Polar Wolf or White Wolf, is a member of the Canidae family, and a subspecies of Gray Wolf. Arctic Wolves inhabit the Canadian Arctic and the northern parts of Greenland. Arctic Wolves generally are smaller than Gray Wolves, being about 3 to 6 feet long including the tail, males being larger than females. Their shoulder heights vary from 25 to 31 inches. Arctic Wolves are bulkier than Gray Wolves, often weighing over 100 pounds. Weights...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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