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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Women's Hospital Stories

Men Who Treat Their Diabetes With Insulin Face Higher Risk Of Heart Disease
2012-03-27 07:07:59

Researchers at Brigham and Women´s Hospital (BWH) have conducted a study showing a link between diabetes and heart risks in men. According to the study, men who used insulin to treat their Type 2 diabetes and who did not have a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were at a higher risk for major cardiovascular events such as death, heart attack or stroke than those men who had a history of CVD. The BWH team presented their findings at the American College of Cardiology 2012 Annual...

2012-03-26 23:35:35

Researchers report no significant difference in high versus low dose aspirin in preventing recurring cardiovascular events. Each year, more than one million Americans suffer a heart attack and nearly all patients are prescribed a daily aspirin and an antiplatelet medication during recovery.  However, the optimal aspirin dose has been unclear.  Now, new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) reports that there is no significant difference between high versus low dose...

2012-03-26 23:31:44

New research finds ongoing treatment with ticagrelor safe and effective in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Ticagrelor, a potent anti-platelet medication, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the summer of 2011 and is known to significantly reduce the risk of stroke, heart attack, vascular death and death overall in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which are characterized by symptoms related to obstruction in coronary arteries, which supply blood to the...

Predicting Risk Of Heart Attacks With Chromosome Length
2012-03-26 12:19:20

Scientists in Boston, Massachusetts have discovered a chromosomal link to heart cancer by studying the length of proteins in a chromosome. The key factor at play in this research are telemores, or DNA protein complexes. These protein complexes can be thought of as “caps”, protecting chromosomes from deteriorating and melding with other chromosomes. As time goes on and chromosomes continue to replicate and cells divide, these telemores will naturally shorten. How much these...

2012-03-26 12:18:53

Human geneticists have long debated whether the genetic risk of the most common medical conditions derive from many rare mutations, each conferring a high degree of risk in different people, or common differences throughout the genome that modestly influence risk. A new study by Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) researchers has harnessed data and new analysis tools to address this question in four common diseases: rheumatoid arthritis; celiac disease; coronary artery disease and...