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Latest Woodboring beetles Stories

2014-07-22 08:23:43

- Chemical treatment less costly than removal, protects even large ash trees with high density of EAB CHICAGO, July 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In a little more than 10 years EAB has killed in excess of 100 million ash trees throughout the Midwest, with a high percentage of those from urban areas. The presence of the lethal beetle threatens ash in the eastern half of the United States and has now spread west of the Mississippi into Missouri, Iowa and Minnesota. A new report by entomologists...

2014-05-26 12:30:18

ESA Risk analysis finds savings for homeowners and local governments of excluding invasive pests like the emerald ash borer outweigh added cost to imported goods The emerald ash borer (Agrilus plantipenis), a recent insect immigrant to North America carried in with the wooden packing material of imported goods, is projected to cause over a billion dollars in damages annually over the next decade. International standards now require expensive fumigation or heat treatment of wood pallets...

Using Fungus To Stop Invasive Spread Of Tree-Of-Heaven
2014-05-10 04:00:57

By Matt Swayne, Penn State A naturally occurring fungus might help curb the spread of an invasive tree species that is threatening forests in most of the United States, according to researchers. Researchers tested the fungus -- Verticillium nonalfalfae -- by injecting it into tree-of-heaven, or Ailanthus, plots, according to Matthew Kasson, who recently received his doctorate in plant pathology and environmental microbiology from Penn State. The treatment completely eradicated the...

Rocky Mountain National Park
2014-04-22 07:07:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An infestation of bark beetles is killing trees in the mountains across the western US. The beetles all reproduce in the inner bark of the trees, though they kill the trees in different ways. For example, the mountain pine beetle attacks and kills live trees, while other species live in dead, weakened or dying trees. In fact, more than 3.4 million acres of pine trees in Colorado alone have fallen to the mountain pine beetle....

2014-04-01 23:26:30

Opportunities and threats to forest utilization and management, such as emerald ash borer, will bring leading minds together for SAF-credited educational tracks, industry tours, and world-class networking at Forest Business Network's summer event. Rochester, MN (PRWEB) April 01, 2014 What are the wood utilization options for urban trees infested by invasive species like the emerald ash borer? Elite minds within the forest products industry will address this question—and many...

2014-02-26 12:22:02

HARRISBURG, Pa., Feb. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Methods to combat an invasive insect pest proving deadly to Pennsylvania's ash trees will be showcased in the coming months in a series of free, public workshops planned across the state, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Ellen Ferretti announced today. "Municipal officials, landscapers and home and woodland owners all are asking what they can do as this destructive insect spreads steadily across our...

Slippery Bark Helps Protect Trees From Pine Beetle Attack
2013-12-23 13:45:28

University of Colorado Boulder Trees with smoother bark are better at repelling attacks by mountain pine beetles, which have difficulty gripping the slippery surface, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. The findings, published online in the journal Functional Ecology, may help land managers make decisions about which trees to cull and which to keep in order to best protect forested properties against pine beetle infestation. The current mountain pine...

Bait Research Focused On Outsmarting Destructive Mountain Pine Beetle
2013-11-15 13:41:44

University of Alberta University of Alberta researchers are closing in on finding an effective bait to get ahead of the destructive spread of mountain pine beetle, which is now killing not only lodgepole pine forests, but jack pine. Nadir Erbilgin, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Forest Entomology in the University of Alberta Department of Renewable Resources, has been investigating pheromones emitted by the pest in North America's lodgepole and jack pine forests....

Treasure Trove Of Jewel-like Beetles Discovered
2013-10-15 12:05:26

Pensoft Publishers The bottomless pit of insect biodiversity has yielded a treasure trove of new species of jewel-like clown beetles. In a paper published today in the journal ZooKeys, Michael Caterino and Alexey Tishechkin of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History describe 85 new species in the genus Baconia, renowned for their brilliant coloration and bizarrely flattened body forms. The new species bring the genus up to 116 total species. The new species, mainly from North and...

Climate Change Produces Complicated Consequences For North America's Forests
2013-10-15 11:35:58

Dartmouth College Dartmouth-led study is the most comprehensive review of warming's impacts on forest pests, diseases Climate change affects forests across North America – in some cases permitting insect outbreaks, plant diseases, wildfires and other problems -- but Dartmouth researchers say warmer temperatures are also making many forests grow faster and some less susceptible to pests, which could boost forest health and acreage, timber harvests, carbon storage, water recycling and...


Latest Woodboring beetles Reference Libraries

40_aa7129192d69d157eeabb7bc55896155
2005-09-12 09:52:32

The Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is native to China and Korea where it causes widespread destruction of poplar, willow, elm, and maple throughout vast areas of eastern Asia. Asian longhorned beetles are big, showy insects: shiny and coal black with white spots. Adults are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. On their head is a pair of very long antennae that are alternately ringed in black and white. The antennae are longer than the insect's body. An invasive species in...

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This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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